Recurrent food crises and climate change, along with habitat loss and pollution, have put food security and environmental sustainability at the top of the political agenda. Analyses of the dynamic links between food consumption patterns and environmental concerns have received considerable attention from the international community (FAO, 2012; Esnouf et al, 2013). Using the lens of a wide sustainability concept, this paper develops a multidimensional framework for evaluating sustainability in food systems and diets applicable to the Mediterranean countries. This biogeographic interlocked and heterogeneous area, presenting several conditions of vulnerability to food insecurity and unsustainability, is identified as one of the main critical hotspots of environmental unsustainability for intense human activities (Brunori et al, 2009). Furthermore the demographic growth, in urban and littoral areas, increases the pressure on natural resources (CIHEAM, 2012; Plan Bleu, 2013), as modern cities rely mainly on imported food and goods, enhancing GHG emissions (Grewal, 2012). To tackle such a large set of issues, the identification of multidimensional approaches is key. With regard to food systems, the current analysis of sustainability proceeds towards a multidimensional perspective to achieve food and nutritional security. Coherently with this framework, a key question for urban food systems is: Are food security outcomes vulnerable to urbanization in Mediterranean countries?

Urbanization and food security ! in Mediterranean countries: ! A multidimensional vulnerability approach.

PERI, IURI;
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Abstract

Recurrent food crises and climate change, along with habitat loss and pollution, have put food security and environmental sustainability at the top of the political agenda. Analyses of the dynamic links between food consumption patterns and environmental concerns have received considerable attention from the international community (FAO, 2012; Esnouf et al, 2013). Using the lens of a wide sustainability concept, this paper develops a multidimensional framework for evaluating sustainability in food systems and diets applicable to the Mediterranean countries. This biogeographic interlocked and heterogeneous area, presenting several conditions of vulnerability to food insecurity and unsustainability, is identified as one of the main critical hotspots of environmental unsustainability for intense human activities (Brunori et al, 2009). Furthermore the demographic growth, in urban and littoral areas, increases the pressure on natural resources (CIHEAM, 2012; Plan Bleu, 2013), as modern cities rely mainly on imported food and goods, enhancing GHG emissions (Grewal, 2012). To tackle such a large set of issues, the identification of multidimensional approaches is key. With regard to food systems, the current analysis of sustainability proceeds towards a multidimensional perspective to achieve food and nutritional security. Coherently with this framework, a key question for urban food systems is: Are food security outcomes vulnerable to urbanization in Mediterranean countries?
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/103910
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