Background: The pentagon copy is a sensitive item to the prediction of cognitive decline and dementia. Cognitive and physical/motor decline are able to accelerate the evolution of each other, by representing a common pathway towards frailty.Objectives: To investigate the association of the pentagon-copying task with physical and motor performances and with frailty, in a sample of older adults.Method: This observational, cross-sectional and single-center study was conducted in a Geriatric Outpatients Clinic. Subjects aged >= 65 years were consecutively recruited, on a voluntary basis. Subjects with positive psychiatric history, with a severe neurocognitive disorder, with severe limitations on the upper limbs and/or reporting sensory deficits were excluded. The pentagon-copying task was scored from the Mini Mental State Examination; the Qualitative Scoring Pentagon Test (QSPT) was also used. Handgrip strength was measured; a 46-item Frailty Index was calculated; in subjects with autonomous walking, a 4-meter gait speed was also measured.Results: The study included 253 subjects (mean age 80.59 +/- 6.89 years). Subjects making a wrong pentagon copy showed greater odds of exhibiting a strength deficit (OR = 3.57; p=0.001) and of being frail (OR= 4.80; p<0.001), and exhibited a slower gait. The QSTP score was significantly correlated with handgrip strength (r= 0.388) and gait speed (r= 0.188), and inversely correlated with frailty (r= -0.428); the QSTP score was significantly different between the quartiles of handgrip strength and frailty.Conclusions: The pentagon copying-task might also be confirmed as a quick screening tool of aging trajectories towards frailty, by jointly evaluating cognitive and physical performances.

Is the Pentagon-Copying Task More than a Cognitive Feature? Associations with Handgrip Strength, Gait Speed, and Frailty in Older Adults

Sardella, Alberto;Quattropani, Maria C.;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background: The pentagon copy is a sensitive item to the prediction of cognitive decline and dementia. Cognitive and physical/motor decline are able to accelerate the evolution of each other, by representing a common pathway towards frailty.Objectives: To investigate the association of the pentagon-copying task with physical and motor performances and with frailty, in a sample of older adults.Method: This observational, cross-sectional and single-center study was conducted in a Geriatric Outpatients Clinic. Subjects aged >= 65 years were consecutively recruited, on a voluntary basis. Subjects with positive psychiatric history, with a severe neurocognitive disorder, with severe limitations on the upper limbs and/or reporting sensory deficits were excluded. The pentagon-copying task was scored from the Mini Mental State Examination; the Qualitative Scoring Pentagon Test (QSPT) was also used. Handgrip strength was measured; a 46-item Frailty Index was calculated; in subjects with autonomous walking, a 4-meter gait speed was also measured.Results: The study included 253 subjects (mean age 80.59 +/- 6.89 years). Subjects making a wrong pentagon copy showed greater odds of exhibiting a strength deficit (OR = 3.57; p=0.001) and of being frail (OR= 4.80; p<0.001), and exhibited a slower gait. The QSTP score was significantly correlated with handgrip strength (r= 0.388) and gait speed (r= 0.188), and inversely correlated with frailty (r= -0.428); the QSTP score was significantly different between the quartiles of handgrip strength and frailty.Conclusions: The pentagon copying-task might also be confirmed as a quick screening tool of aging trajectories towards frailty, by jointly evaluating cognitive and physical performances.
2024
Clinical psychology
Cognitive impairment
Frailty
Handgrip strength
Pentagon copy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/589096
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