We evaluated the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in relation to adherence to the Mediterranean diet. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on randomly enrolled 3090 subjects (14 to 88 y old) living in Sicily, Southern Italy. Anthropometric indices were measured and adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed by a diet score that incorporated the inherent characteristics of this diet. Adherence rates did not differ between rural and urban area, although older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1-1.01), higher education (OR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03-1.54), and marital status (OR 1.31, 95% CI: 1.05-1.63) were associated with higher adherence compared with lower categories. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 35.4 and 13.9%, respectively. Hypertensive subjects were 27.7% and diabetic were 5.7%. An inverse relation was observed between diet score, body mass index (r = -0.045, P <0.001) and waist circumference (r = -0.023, P <0.001) after adjusting for sex and age. Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet (i.e., highest tertile) was associated with lower odds of being obese (OR 0.34, 95% CI: 0.24-0.50), hypertensive (OR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56-0.98), and diabetic (OR 0.40, 95% CI: 0.24-0.77) compared with a non-Mediterranean diet (i.e., lowest tertile) after controlling for age, sex, physical activity status, and other variables. We observed an inverse relation between adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern and prevalence of obesity in population-based sample, irrespective of various potential confounders.

Adherence to Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular risk factors in Sicily, South Italy

MISTRETTA, Antonio
2012

Abstract

We evaluated the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in relation to adherence to the Mediterranean diet. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on randomly enrolled 3090 subjects (14 to 88 y old) living in Sicily, Southern Italy. Anthropometric indices were measured and adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed by a diet score that incorporated the inherent characteristics of this diet. Adherence rates did not differ between rural and urban area, although older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1-1.01), higher education (OR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03-1.54), and marital status (OR 1.31, 95% CI: 1.05-1.63) were associated with higher adherence compared with lower categories. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 35.4 and 13.9%, respectively. Hypertensive subjects were 27.7% and diabetic were 5.7%. An inverse relation was observed between diet score, body mass index (r = -0.045, P <0.001) and waist circumference (r = -0.023, P <0.001) after adjusting for sex and age. Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet (i.e., highest tertile) was associated with lower odds of being obese (OR 0.34, 95% CI: 0.24-0.50), hypertensive (OR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56-0.98), and diabetic (OR 0.40, 95% CI: 0.24-0.77) compared with a non-Mediterranean diet (i.e., lowest tertile) after controlling for age, sex, physical activity status, and other variables. We observed an inverse relation between adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern and prevalence of obesity in population-based sample, irrespective of various potential confounders.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/111950
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