Learning capabilities, often guided by competition/ cooperation, play a fundamental and ubiquitous role in living beings. Moreover, several behaviours, such as feeding and courtship, involve environmental exploration and exploitation, including local competition, and lead to a global benefit for the colony. This can be considered as a form of global cooperation, even if the individual agent is not aware of the overall effect. This paper aims to demon‐ strate that identical biorobots, endowed with simple neural controllers, can evolve diversified behaviours and roles when competing for the same resources in the same arena. These behaviours also produce a benefit in terms of time and energy spent by the whole group. The robots are tasked with a classical foraging task structured through the cyclic activation of resources. The result is that each individual robot, while competing to reach the maximum number of available targets, tends to prefer a specific sequence of sub- tasks. This indirectly leads to the global result of task partitioning, whereby the cumulative energy spent, in terms of the overall travelled distance and the time needed to complete the task, tends to be minimized. A series of simulation experiments is conducted using different numbers of robots and scenarios: the common emergent result obtained is the role-specialization of each robot. The description of the neural controller and the specialization mechanisms are reported in detail and discussed.

Emergence of Diversity in a Group of Identical Bio-robots

Alessandra Vitanza;ARENA, Paolo Pietro
2015-01-01

Abstract

Learning capabilities, often guided by competition/ cooperation, play a fundamental and ubiquitous role in living beings. Moreover, several behaviours, such as feeding and courtship, involve environmental exploration and exploitation, including local competition, and lead to a global benefit for the colony. This can be considered as a form of global cooperation, even if the individual agent is not aware of the overall effect. This paper aims to demon‐ strate that identical biorobots, endowed with simple neural controllers, can evolve diversified behaviours and roles when competing for the same resources in the same arena. These behaviours also produce a benefit in terms of time and energy spent by the whole group. The robots are tasked with a classical foraging task structured through the cyclic activation of resources. The result is that each individual robot, while competing to reach the maximum number of available targets, tends to prefer a specific sequence of sub- tasks. This indirectly leads to the global result of task partitioning, whereby the cumulative energy spent, in terms of the overall travelled distance and the time needed to complete the task, tends to be minimized. A series of simulation experiments is conducted using different numbers of robots and scenarios: the common emergent result obtained is the role-specialization of each robot. The description of the neural controller and the specialization mechanisms are reported in detail and discussed.
Bio-robotics,; Multi-robot Systems,; Collaborative Algorithms,
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/17255
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