PURPOSE:Psychiatric disorders could affect the patients' abilities to cope with diabetes. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of depression and alexithymia among type 2 diabetic patients and investigate the possible correlations between these psychopathological phenomena and glycaemic control assessed through glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c).METHODS:All the patients were evaluated through 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), Hamilton rating scale for depression and Quality of Life Index. HbA1c values, diabetes duration, therapy and socio-demographic characteristics were recorded.RESULTS:One hundred and twenty-eight patients (75 males and 53 female, mean age 64.7 ± 11.2 years) were enrolled. Alexithymic patients, compared to non-alexithymic ones, presented a significantly higher HbA1c (7.7 ± 1.5 vs. 7 ± 1.5, p = 0.016). No statistically significant difference was found when comparing the HbA1c of depressed versus non-depressed patients. Considering the raw values of HbA1c, the higher percentage was recorded among patients suffering from depression plus alexithymia (comorbidity group) followed by patients presenting alexithymia only, patients with neither depression nor alexithymia (control group) and, finally, those presenting depression only. The comorbidity group presented a significantly higher value of HbA1c (7.7 ± 1.2) than the control group (7 ± 1.6, p < 0.04) and the depressed patients (6.9 ± 1.3, p = 0.04). At the logistic regression, the HbA1c was found to be significantly associated only with alexithymia (TAS-20 total score) and insulin therapy.CONCLUSIONS:Alexithymia more than depression influences glycaemic control. When evaluating a diabetic patient, a rapid screening for psychopathological alterations would guarantee a more accurate management. The treatment of any associated psychiatric disorders would improve the patients' quality of life.

Alexithymia, more than depression, influences glycaemic control of type 2 diabetic patients.

Luca A
Primo
;
DI MAURO, Maurizio;
2015-01-01

Abstract

PURPOSE:Psychiatric disorders could affect the patients' abilities to cope with diabetes. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of depression and alexithymia among type 2 diabetic patients and investigate the possible correlations between these psychopathological phenomena and glycaemic control assessed through glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c).METHODS:All the patients were evaluated through 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), Hamilton rating scale for depression and Quality of Life Index. HbA1c values, diabetes duration, therapy and socio-demographic characteristics were recorded.RESULTS:One hundred and twenty-eight patients (75 males and 53 female, mean age 64.7 ± 11.2 years) were enrolled. Alexithymic patients, compared to non-alexithymic ones, presented a significantly higher HbA1c (7.7 ± 1.5 vs. 7 ± 1.5, p = 0.016). No statistically significant difference was found when comparing the HbA1c of depressed versus non-depressed patients. Considering the raw values of HbA1c, the higher percentage was recorded among patients suffering from depression plus alexithymia (comorbidity group) followed by patients presenting alexithymia only, patients with neither depression nor alexithymia (control group) and, finally, those presenting depression only. The comorbidity group presented a significantly higher value of HbA1c (7.7 ± 1.2) than the control group (7 ± 1.6, p < 0.04) and the depressed patients (6.9 ± 1.3, p = 0.04). At the logistic regression, the HbA1c was found to be significantly associated only with alexithymia (TAS-20 total score) and insulin therapy.CONCLUSIONS:Alexithymia more than depression influences glycaemic control. When evaluating a diabetic patient, a rapid screening for psychopathological alterations would guarantee a more accurate management. The treatment of any associated psychiatric disorders would improve the patients' quality of life.
Alexithymia; Diabetes; Depression; Glycaemic control; HbA1c
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/17733
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