Neuropharmacology. 2004 Dec;47(8):1205-16. Anticonvulsant effects of carbenoxolone in genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPRs). Gareri P, Condorelli D, Belluardo N, Russo E, Loiacono A, Barresi V, Trovato-Salinaro A, Mirone MB, Ferreri Ibbadu G, De Sarro G. Section of Pharmacology, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy. Erratum in Neuropharmacology. 2009 Jul;57(1):76. Trovato-Salinato, Angela [corrected to Trovato-Salinaro, Angela]. Carbenoxolone (CBX), the succinyl ester of glycyrrhetinic acid, is an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular communication. Systemic administration of CBX was able to decrease the seizure severity score and to increase the latency time of seizure onset in genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPRs). In particular, intravenous or intraperitoneal administration of carbenoxolone (5-30 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent and significant reduction in the clonic and tonic phases of the audiogenic seizures in GEPRs. The anticonvulsant doses were not associated with an impairment of motor coordination. The bilateral microinjection of CBX (0.001-0.50 microg/0.5 microl) into the inferior colliculi, the substantia nigra (pars reticulata or compacta) and the inferior olivary complex was able to reduce the seizure severity score in a dose-dependent manner. The anticonvulsant effects were longer lasting after focal microinjection than after systemic administration. No anticonvulsant effects were observed following focal bilateral microinjections of glycyrrhizin into the same brain areas where CBX was shown to be effective. PMID: 15567430 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Carbenoxolone (CBX), the succinyl ester of glycyrrhetinic acid. is an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular commuication. Systemic administration of CBX was able to decrease the seizure severity score and to increase the latency time of seizure onset in genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPRs). In particular, intravenous or intraperitoneal administration of carbenoxolone (5-30 mg/ kg) produced a dose-dependent and significant reduction in the clonic and ionic phases of the audiogenic seizures in GEPRs. The anticonvulsant doses were not associated with an impairment of motor coordination. The bilateral microinjection of CBX (0.001-0.50 mug/0.5 mul) into the inferior colliculi, the substantia nigra (pars reticulata or compacta) and inferior oviary complex was able to reduce the seizure severity score in a dose-dependent manner. The anticonvulsant effects were longer lasting after focal microinjection than after systemic administration. No anticonvulsant effects were observed following focal bilateral microinjections of glycyrrhizin into the same brain areas where CBX was shown to be effective. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Anticonvulsant effects of carbenoxolone in genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPRs)

CONDORELLI, Daniele Filippo;BARRESI, VINCENZA;Trovato Salinaro A;
2004-01-01

Abstract

Carbenoxolone (CBX), the succinyl ester of glycyrrhetinic acid. is an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular commuication. Systemic administration of CBX was able to decrease the seizure severity score and to increase the latency time of seizure onset in genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPRs). In particular, intravenous or intraperitoneal administration of carbenoxolone (5-30 mg/ kg) produced a dose-dependent and significant reduction in the clonic and ionic phases of the audiogenic seizures in GEPRs. The anticonvulsant doses were not associated with an impairment of motor coordination. The bilateral microinjection of CBX (0.001-0.50 mug/0.5 mul) into the inferior colliculi, the substantia nigra (pars reticulata or compacta) and inferior oviary complex was able to reduce the seizure severity score in a dose-dependent manner. The anticonvulsant effects were longer lasting after focal microinjection than after systemic administration. No anticonvulsant effects were observed following focal bilateral microinjections of glycyrrhizin into the same brain areas where CBX was shown to be effective. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Neuropharmacology. 2004 Dec;47(8):1205-16. Anticonvulsant effects of carbenoxolone in genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPRs). Gareri P, Condorelli D, Belluardo N, Russo E, Loiacono A, Barresi V, Trovato-Salinaro A, Mirone MB, Ferreri Ibbadu G, De Sarro G. Section of Pharmacology, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy. Erratum in Neuropharmacology. 2009 Jul;57(1):76. Trovato-Salinato, Angela [corrected to Trovato-Salinaro, Angela]. Carbenoxolone (CBX), the succinyl ester of glycyrrhetinic acid, is an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular communication. Systemic administration of CBX was able to decrease the seizure severity score and to increase the latency time of seizure onset in genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPRs). In particular, intravenous or intraperitoneal administration of carbenoxolone (5-30 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent and significant reduction in the clonic and tonic phases of the audiogenic seizures in GEPRs. The anticonvulsant doses were not associated with an impairment of motor coordination. The bilateral microinjection of CBX (0.001-0.50 microg/0.5 microl) into the inferior colliculi, the substantia nigra (pars reticulata or compacta) and the inferior olivary complex was able to reduce the seizure severity score in a dose-dependent manner. The anticonvulsant effects were longer lasting after focal microinjection than after systemic administration. No anticonvulsant effects were observed following focal bilateral microinjections of glycyrrhizin into the same brain areas where CBX was shown to be effective. PMID: 15567430 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/19978
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