Ambient noise measurements performed on the western flank of Mt. Etna are analyzed to infer the occurrence of directional amplification effects in fault zones. The data were recorded along short (<500 m) profiles crossing the Ragalna Fault System. Ambient noise records were processed to compute the horizontal-to-vertical noise spectral ratio as a function of frequency and direction of motion. Wavefield polarization was investigated in the time–frequency domain as well. Peaks of the spectral ratios generally fall in the frequency band 1.0–6.0 Hz pointing out directional amplifications that are also confirmed by the results of the time–frequency analysis, the largest amplification occurring with high angle to the fault strike. A variation of the frequency of the spectral peak is observed between the two sides of the fault, possibly related to a damage fault asymmetry. Measurements performed several kilometers away from the fault zone do not show behavior that is as systematic as in the fault zone, and this suggests that the observed directional effects can be ascribed to the fault fabric. We relate the polarization effect to compliance anisotropy in the fault zone, where the presence of predominantly oriented fractures makes the normal component of ground motion larger than the transversal one. In order to test the direction and the type of fractures that are expected in the fault zone, we modeled the brittle deformation pattern of the investigated fault. Theoretical results are in good agreement with field observations of the fracture strike

Wavefield polarization in fault zones of the western flank of Mt. Etna: observations and fracture orientation modelling

PANZERA, FRANCESCO;LOMBARDO, Giuseppe;MONACO, Carmelo Giovanni;
2014-01-01

Abstract

Ambient noise measurements performed on the western flank of Mt. Etna are analyzed to infer the occurrence of directional amplification effects in fault zones. The data were recorded along short (<500 m) profiles crossing the Ragalna Fault System. Ambient noise records were processed to compute the horizontal-to-vertical noise spectral ratio as a function of frequency and direction of motion. Wavefield polarization was investigated in the time–frequency domain as well. Peaks of the spectral ratios generally fall in the frequency band 1.0–6.0 Hz pointing out directional amplifications that are also confirmed by the results of the time–frequency analysis, the largest amplification occurring with high angle to the fault strike. A variation of the frequency of the spectral peak is observed between the two sides of the fault, possibly related to a damage fault asymmetry. Measurements performed several kilometers away from the fault zone do not show behavior that is as systematic as in the fault zone, and this suggests that the observed directional effects can be ascribed to the fault fabric. We relate the polarization effect to compliance anisotropy in the fault zone, where the presence of predominantly oriented fractures makes the normal component of ground motion larger than the transversal one. In order to test the direction and the type of fractures that are expected in the fault zone, we modeled the brittle deformation pattern of the investigated fault. Theoretical results are in good agreement with field observations of the fracture strike
2014
Directional resonance; fault zone; Mt. Etna; wavefield polarization
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/255047
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