Chitosan microspheres loaded moxifloxacin were prepared to obtain sustained release of the drug after intrapulmonary administration. The microspheres were produced by the spray-drying method using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinking agent. The particles were spherical with a smooth but distorted surface morphology and were of small size, ranging from 2.5 to 6.0microm, thus suitable for inhalation. In vitro release studies showed a significant burst effect for all crosslinked systems, followed by a prolonged moxifloxacin release, particularly in the presence of the highest glutaraldehyde concentration. Lipid vesicles made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were used as an in vitro biomembrane model to evaluate the influence of chitosan microspheres on the interaction of moxifloxacin with biological membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry was used as a simple and non-invasive technique of analysis. Moxifloxacin freely permeates through DPPC liposomes, interacting with the hydrophobic zone of the bilayers (lowering of the DeltaH value and loss of the cooperativity of the main transition peak). Uncrosslinked microspheres rapidly swelled and dissolved releasing free chitosan that was able to interact with liposomes (increase of DeltaH value), probably altering the biomembrane permeability to the drug. Crosslinked microspheres did not show this property. Pulmonary absorption of moxifloxacin-loaded chitosan microspheres was evaluated compared to the free drug. A monolayer of Calu-3 human bronchial epithelial cells mounted on Franz diffusion cells was used as an in vitro bronchial epithelium model. Microspheres retard the absorption of moxifloxacin and within 6h the cumulative amount of permeated drug was about 18%, 11% and 7% (w/w) for free moxifloxacin, moxifloxacin-loaded crosslinked and moxifloxacin-loaded uncrosslinked microspheres, respectively.

Chitosan microspheres for intrapulmonary administration of moxifloxacin: Interaction with biomembrane models and in vitro permeation studies

CARDILE, Venera;
2008

Abstract

Chitosan microspheres loaded moxifloxacin were prepared to obtain sustained release of the drug after intrapulmonary administration. The microspheres were produced by the spray-drying method using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinking agent. The particles were spherical with a smooth but distorted surface morphology and were of small size, ranging from 2.5 to 6.0microm, thus suitable for inhalation. In vitro release studies showed a significant burst effect for all crosslinked systems, followed by a prolonged moxifloxacin release, particularly in the presence of the highest glutaraldehyde concentration. Lipid vesicles made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were used as an in vitro biomembrane model to evaluate the influence of chitosan microspheres on the interaction of moxifloxacin with biological membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry was used as a simple and non-invasive technique of analysis. Moxifloxacin freely permeates through DPPC liposomes, interacting with the hydrophobic zone of the bilayers (lowering of the DeltaH value and loss of the cooperativity of the main transition peak). Uncrosslinked microspheres rapidly swelled and dissolved releasing free chitosan that was able to interact with liposomes (increase of DeltaH value), probably altering the biomembrane permeability to the drug. Crosslinked microspheres did not show this property. Pulmonary absorption of moxifloxacin-loaded chitosan microspheres was evaluated compared to the free drug. A monolayer of Calu-3 human bronchial epithelial cells mounted on Franz diffusion cells was used as an in vitro bronchial epithelium model. Microspheres retard the absorption of moxifloxacin and within 6h the cumulative amount of permeated drug was about 18%, 11% and 7% (w/w) for free moxifloxacin, moxifloxacin-loaded crosslinked and moxifloxacin-loaded uncrosslinked microspheres, respectively.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/27029
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