Background: Since the survival rates of cancer have increased considerably, the long-term side effects of cancer and cancer-related treatments may impact survivors’ capability to regain normal lives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the breast cancer on the job satisfaction and the quality of life. Methods: We enrolled 130 women divided into four groups: 1) 40 breast cancer survivors (aged 39 - 50); 2) 44 women diagnosed with breast cancer (aged 35 - 49); 3) 46 women in good health status (aged 37 - 48). Job satisfaction was measured with the Warr-Cook-Wall (WCW) Job satisfaction scale that measures overall job satisfaction and satisfaction with nine aspects of work. Results: Compared to healthy subjects, breast cancer survivors reported a poorer number of hours of work (p < 0.05) and a significant amount of variety in job (p < 0.01), opportunity to use abilities (p < 0.001), income (p < 0.01). Compared to patients with breast cancer at diagnosis, breast cancer survivors reported a significant amount of variety in job (p < 0.05), opportunity to use abilities (p < 0.05), amount of responsibility (p < 0.05), income (p < 0.05). In our study, the comparison between breast cancer survivors, breast cancer at diagnosis, and healthy subjects does not differ significantly in overall job satisfaction. Conclusions: Understanding the job problems associated with cancer can provide relevant information regarding potential treatment and psychological support in breast cancer survivors.

The Role of Work in Breast Cancer Patients

Pennisi M;CHISARI, Giuseppe;DRAGO, Filippo;CATANIA, Vito Emanuele;MALAGUARNERA, Mariano
2013-01-01

Abstract

Background: Since the survival rates of cancer have increased considerably, the long-term side effects of cancer and cancer-related treatments may impact survivors’ capability to regain normal lives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the breast cancer on the job satisfaction and the quality of life. Methods: We enrolled 130 women divided into four groups: 1) 40 breast cancer survivors (aged 39 - 50); 2) 44 women diagnosed with breast cancer (aged 35 - 49); 3) 46 women in good health status (aged 37 - 48). Job satisfaction was measured with the Warr-Cook-Wall (WCW) Job satisfaction scale that measures overall job satisfaction and satisfaction with nine aspects of work. Results: Compared to healthy subjects, breast cancer survivors reported a poorer number of hours of work (p < 0.05) and a significant amount of variety in job (p < 0.01), opportunity to use abilities (p < 0.001), income (p < 0.01). Compared to patients with breast cancer at diagnosis, breast cancer survivors reported a significant amount of variety in job (p < 0.05), opportunity to use abilities (p < 0.05), amount of responsibility (p < 0.05), income (p < 0.05). In our study, the comparison between breast cancer survivors, breast cancer at diagnosis, and healthy subjects does not differ significantly in overall job satisfaction. Conclusions: Understanding the job problems associated with cancer can provide relevant information regarding potential treatment and psychological support in breast cancer survivors.
Breast Cancer, Job Satisfaction, Quality of Life, Cancer Survivors, Work, Absenteeism, Presenteeism
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/28089
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