Objective: To correlate clinical and pathological characteristics at diagnosis with patient long-term outcomes and to evaluate ongoing risk stratifications in a large series of paediatric differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC). Study design: Retrospective analysis of clinical and pathological prognostic factors of 124 paediatric patients with DTC (age at diagnosis <19 years) followed up for 10.4 ± 8.4 years. Patients with a follow-up >3 years (n = 104) were re-classified 18 months after surgery on the basis of their response to therapy (ongoing risk stratification). Results: Most patients had a papillary histotype (96.0%), were older than 15 years (75.0%) and were diagnosed because of clinical local symptoms (63.7%). Persistent/recurrent disease was present in 31.5% of cases during follow-up, but at the last evaluation, only 12.9% had biochemical or structural disease. The presence of metastases in the lymph nodes of the lateral compartment (OR 3.2, 95% CI, 1.28–7.16, P = 0.01) was the only independent factor associated with recurrent/persistent disease during follow-up. At the last evaluation, biochemical/structural disease was associated with node metastases (N1a, N1b) by univariate but not multivariate analysis. Ongoing risk stratification compared to the initial risk classification method better identified patients with a lower probability of persistent/recurrent disease (NPV = 100%). Conclusions: In spite of the aggressive presentations at diagnosis, paediatric patients with DTC show an excellent response to treatment and often a favourable outcome. N1b status should be considered a strong predictor of persistent/recurrent disease which, as in adults, is better predicted by ongoing risk stratification.

Differentiated thyroid cancer in children: Heterogeneity of predictive risk factors

Malandrino, Pasqualino;Sapuppo, Giulia;Calaciura, Francesca;Regalbuto, Concetto;Belfiore, Antonino;Vigneri, Riccardo;Pellegriti, Gabriella
2018

Abstract

Objective: To correlate clinical and pathological characteristics at diagnosis with patient long-term outcomes and to evaluate ongoing risk stratifications in a large series of paediatric differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC). Study design: Retrospective analysis of clinical and pathological prognostic factors of 124 paediatric patients with DTC (age at diagnosis <19 years) followed up for 10.4 ± 8.4 years. Patients with a follow-up >3 years (n = 104) were re-classified 18 months after surgery on the basis of their response to therapy (ongoing risk stratification). Results: Most patients had a papillary histotype (96.0%), were older than 15 years (75.0%) and were diagnosed because of clinical local symptoms (63.7%). Persistent/recurrent disease was present in 31.5% of cases during follow-up, but at the last evaluation, only 12.9% had biochemical or structural disease. The presence of metastases in the lymph nodes of the lateral compartment (OR 3.2, 95% CI, 1.28–7.16, P = 0.01) was the only independent factor associated with recurrent/persistent disease during follow-up. At the last evaluation, biochemical/structural disease was associated with node metastases (N1a, N1b) by univariate but not multivariate analysis. Ongoing risk stratification compared to the initial risk classification method better identified patients with a lower probability of persistent/recurrent disease (NPV = 100%). Conclusions: In spite of the aggressive presentations at diagnosis, paediatric patients with DTC show an excellent response to treatment and often a favourable outcome. N1b status should be considered a strong predictor of persistent/recurrent disease which, as in adults, is better predicted by ongoing risk stratification.
ongoing risk stratification; thyroid cancer; thyroid cancer in paediatric age; Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health; Hematology; Oncology
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/333820
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