Context Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) has an excellent prognosis, but up to 20% of patients with DTC have disease events after initial treatment, indistinctly defined as persistent/recurrent disease. Objective To evaluate the prevalence and outcome of "recurrent" disease (relapse after being 12 months disease-free) compared with "persistent" disease (present ab initio since diagnosis). Design Retrospective analysis of persistent/recurrent disease in patients with DTC (1990 to 2016) with 6.5 years of mean follow-up. Setting Tertiary referral center for thyroid cancer. Patients In total, 4292 patients all underwent surgery ± 131 I treatment of DTC. Main Outcome Measures DTC cure of disease persistence or recurrence. Results A total of 639 of 4292 (14.9%) patients had disease events after initial treatment, most (498/639, 78%) with persistent disease and 141 (22%) with recurrent disease. Relative to patients with recurrent disease, patients with persistent disease were significantly older (mean age 46.9 vs 45.7 years) and with a lower female to male ratio (1.9/1 vs 4.8/1). Moreover, in this group, structured disease was more frequent (65.7% vs 41.1%), and more important, distant metastases were significantly more frequent (38.4% vs 17.0%). At multivariate analysis, male sex (OR = 1.7), age (OR = 1.02), follicular histotype (OR = 1.5), T status (T3; OR = 3), and N status (N1b; OR = 7.7) were independently associated with persistent disease. Only the N status was associated with recurrent disease (N1b; OR = 2.5). Conclusions In patients with DTC not cured after initial treatment, persistent disease is more common and has a worse outcome than recurrent disease. Postoperative status evaluated during first-year follow-up may have important clinical implications for planning tailored treatment strategies and long-term follow-up procedures.

Time to Separate Persistent from Recurrent Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Different Conditions with Different Outcomes

Sapuppo, Giulia;Tavarelli, Martina;Belfiore, Antonino;Vigneri, Riccardo;Pellegriti, Gabriella
2018

Abstract

Context Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) has an excellent prognosis, but up to 20% of patients with DTC have disease events after initial treatment, indistinctly defined as persistent/recurrent disease. Objective To evaluate the prevalence and outcome of "recurrent" disease (relapse after being 12 months disease-free) compared with "persistent" disease (present ab initio since diagnosis). Design Retrospective analysis of persistent/recurrent disease in patients with DTC (1990 to 2016) with 6.5 years of mean follow-up. Setting Tertiary referral center for thyroid cancer. Patients In total, 4292 patients all underwent surgery ± 131 I treatment of DTC. Main Outcome Measures DTC cure of disease persistence or recurrence. Results A total of 639 of 4292 (14.9%) patients had disease events after initial treatment, most (498/639, 78%) with persistent disease and 141 (22%) with recurrent disease. Relative to patients with recurrent disease, patients with persistent disease were significantly older (mean age 46.9 vs 45.7 years) and with a lower female to male ratio (1.9/1 vs 4.8/1). Moreover, in this group, structured disease was more frequent (65.7% vs 41.1%), and more important, distant metastases were significantly more frequent (38.4% vs 17.0%). At multivariate analysis, male sex (OR = 1.7), age (OR = 1.02), follicular histotype (OR = 1.5), T status (T3; OR = 3), and N status (N1b; OR = 7.7) were independently associated with persistent disease. Only the N status was associated with recurrent disease (N1b; OR = 2.5). Conclusions In patients with DTC not cured after initial treatment, persistent disease is more common and has a worse outcome than recurrent disease. Postoperative status evaluated during first-year follow-up may have important clinical implications for planning tailored treatment strategies and long-term follow-up procedures.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/361317
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 9
  • Scopus 31
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 30
social impact