Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. Recent developments in iron oxide nanoparticle design and understanding of nanoparticle membrane interactions have led to applications in magnetically triggered, liposome delivery vehicles with controlled structure. Here we study the effect of external physical stimuli—such as millimeter wave radiation—on the induced movement of giant lipid vesicles in suspension containing or not containing iron oxide maghemite (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles (MNPs). To increase our understanding of this phenomenon, we used a new microscope image-based analysis to reveal millimeter wave (MMW)-induced effects on the movement of the vesicles. We found that in the lipid vesicles not containing MNPs, an exposure to MMW induced collective reorientation of vesicle motion occurring at the onset of MMW switch “on.” Instead, no marked changes in the movements of lipid vesicles containing MNPs were observed at the onset of first MMW switch on, but, importantly, by examining the course followed; once the vesicles are already irradiated, a directional motion of vesicles was induced. The latter vesicles were characterized by a planar motion, absence of gravitational effects, and having trajectories spanning a range of deflection angles narrower than vesicles not containing MNPs. An explanation for this observed delayed response could be attributed to the possible interaction of MNPs with components of lipid membrane that, influencing, e.g., phospholipids density and membrane stiffening, ultimately leads to change vesicle movement.

Movement of giant lipid vesicles induced by millimeter wave radiation change when they contain magnetic nanoparticles

Di Donato, Loreto;
2019

Abstract

Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. Recent developments in iron oxide nanoparticle design and understanding of nanoparticle membrane interactions have led to applications in magnetically triggered, liposome delivery vehicles with controlled structure. Here we study the effect of external physical stimuli—such as millimeter wave radiation—on the induced movement of giant lipid vesicles in suspension containing or not containing iron oxide maghemite (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles (MNPs). To increase our understanding of this phenomenon, we used a new microscope image-based analysis to reveal millimeter wave (MMW)-induced effects on the movement of the vesicles. We found that in the lipid vesicles not containing MNPs, an exposure to MMW induced collective reorientation of vesicle motion occurring at the onset of MMW switch “on.” Instead, no marked changes in the movements of lipid vesicles containing MNPs were observed at the onset of first MMW switch on, but, importantly, by examining the course followed; once the vesicles are already irradiated, a directional motion of vesicles was induced. The latter vesicles were characterized by a planar motion, absence of gravitational effects, and having trajectories spanning a range of deflection angles narrower than vesicles not containing MNPs. An explanation for this observed delayed response could be attributed to the possible interaction of MNPs with components of lipid membrane that, influencing, e.g., phospholipids density and membrane stiffening, ultimately leads to change vesicle movement.
Giant unilamellar vesicles; Image-based automatic analysis; Magnetoliposomes; Millimeter waves; Optical microscopy; Vesicle motion; 3003
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Albini2019_Article_MovementOfGiantLipidVesiclesIn.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Dimensione 4.3 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
4.3 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/361930
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact