Urolithiasis is a well-known condition that can affect any part of the urinary tract. With a rate of 3-5% the incidence of upper urinary tract for long has been higher in adults (1-3), but recently it has increased among children reaching 3,3% . Indeed, more than 1% of all urinary stones are seen in patients aged less than 18 years (4). Pediatric urolithiasis is endemic in Turkey and Far East and it is probably due to malnutrition and racial factors (5). The spontaneous stone passage is more likely in children than in adults, indeed ureteral calculi spontaneously pass into 41-63% of children (1). Rate of stone passage depends on size and stone location in the urinary system. Stones sized less than 5 mm have a passage rate ranging from 40% to 98%, whilst stones > 5 mm have between 55% and 50% (6). In the last decade, the use of alpha blockers has proven well efficacious in helping spontaneous passage of distal ureteric stones in adults (7-9). The latest EAU guidelines support their use in adults while remain vague about their use in children because of unclear safety and efficacy (4). In search of evidence supporting or not the use of medical expulsive therapy in children we reviewed the literature dealing with the management of urolithiasis in pediatric patients. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical expulsive therapy (MET), defined as stone expulsion rate, with a-blockers compared to a control group. The secondary aim was to assess the safety, defined as side effects rate, of MET compared to a control group.

Pediatric urolithiasis

Di Benedetto, V;Scuderi, M G;
2019

Abstract

Urolithiasis is a well-known condition that can affect any part of the urinary tract. With a rate of 3-5% the incidence of upper urinary tract for long has been higher in adults (1-3), but recently it has increased among children reaching 3,3% . Indeed, more than 1% of all urinary stones are seen in patients aged less than 18 years (4). Pediatric urolithiasis is endemic in Turkey and Far East and it is probably due to malnutrition and racial factors (5). The spontaneous stone passage is more likely in children than in adults, indeed ureteral calculi spontaneously pass into 41-63% of children (1). Rate of stone passage depends on size and stone location in the urinary system. Stones sized less than 5 mm have a passage rate ranging from 40% to 98%, whilst stones > 5 mm have between 55% and 50% (6). In the last decade, the use of alpha blockers has proven well efficacious in helping spontaneous passage of distal ureteric stones in adults (7-9). The latest EAU guidelines support their use in adults while remain vague about their use in children because of unclear safety and efficacy (4). In search of evidence supporting or not the use of medical expulsive therapy in children we reviewed the literature dealing with the management of urolithiasis in pediatric patients. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical expulsive therapy (MET), defined as stone expulsion rate, with a-blockers compared to a control group. The secondary aim was to assess the safety, defined as side effects rate, of MET compared to a control group.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/371098
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