This paper presents lessons learnt through empirical research work developed in three metropolitan cities in South Italy aimed at exploring if and how the “Smart” framework might improve urban planning in cities with lacks in planning processes. Authors argue that organized networks of citizens (such as non-profit organizations or private associations) together with networks of institutions (such as partnerships amongst municipalities or universities) are needed in order to improve the smartness of a city; technologies are framed as opportunities and supports for more inclusive and informed decision-making processes, i.e. as a tool, rather than as a goal, for effective smartness. The paper discusses the primary findings of a Research Project conducted at the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (DICEA), University of Naples, titled “Smart Energy Master for the Energy Management of Territory” funded by EU. The methodology is based on the case-study method, whose sources of evidence are: quantitative indicators, archival documents, and excerpts from interviews with key stakeholders. In detail, the paper focuses on three Southern Italian cities (Reggio Calabria, Catania and Palermo), which have been clustered for similar challenges they have to face, in relation to their geographical proximity and cultural features. Findings show the twofold use of technologies for cities: on the one hand, technology may be perceived as a panacea and Smart initiatives may be isolated and episodic experiments; on the other, technologies may be critically incorporated in complex policies and initiatives aimed at regenerating urban areas holistically, and Smart initiatives may be coordinated and well-connected experiences. Authors argue that the second cases are feasible approaches for improving urban planning in challenging South-European contexts.

Planning in the era of information and communication technologies. Discussing the “label: Smart” in South-European cities with environmental and socio-economic challenges

Giusy Pappalardo;
2016

Abstract

This paper presents lessons learnt through empirical research work developed in three metropolitan cities in South Italy aimed at exploring if and how the “Smart” framework might improve urban planning in cities with lacks in planning processes. Authors argue that organized networks of citizens (such as non-profit organizations or private associations) together with networks of institutions (such as partnerships amongst municipalities or universities) are needed in order to improve the smartness of a city; technologies are framed as opportunities and supports for more inclusive and informed decision-making processes, i.e. as a tool, rather than as a goal, for effective smartness. The paper discusses the primary findings of a Research Project conducted at the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (DICEA), University of Naples, titled “Smart Energy Master for the Energy Management of Territory” funded by EU. The methodology is based on the case-study method, whose sources of evidence are: quantitative indicators, archival documents, and excerpts from interviews with key stakeholders. In detail, the paper focuses on three Southern Italian cities (Reggio Calabria, Catania and Palermo), which have been clustered for similar challenges they have to face, in relation to their geographical proximity and cultural features. Findings show the twofold use of technologies for cities: on the one hand, technology may be perceived as a panacea and Smart initiatives may be isolated and episodic experiments; on the other, technologies may be critically incorporated in complex policies and initiatives aimed at regenerating urban areas holistically, and Smart initiatives may be coordinated and well-connected experiences. Authors argue that the second cases are feasible approaches for improving urban planning in challenging South-European contexts.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/373219
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