PURPOSE: The prevalence and the etiopathogenesis of thyroid dysfunctions in Klinefelter syndrome (KS) are still unclear. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenetic role of hypogonadism in the thyroid disorders described in KS, with the scope to distinguish between patients with KS and hypogonadism due to other causes (Kallmann syndrome, idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, iatrogenic hypogonadism and acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism after surgical removal of pituitary adenomas) called non-KS. Therefore, we evaluated thyroid function in KS and in non-KS hypogonadal patients. METHODS: This is a case-control multicentre study from KING group: Endocrinology clinics in university-affiliated medical centres. One hundred and seventy four KS, and sixty-two non-KS hypogonadal men were enrolled. The primary outcome was the prevalence of thyroid diseases in KS and in non-KS. Changes in hormonal parameters were evaluated. Exclusion criterion was secondary hypothyroidism. Analyses were performed using Student's t test. Mann-Whitney test and Chi-square test. RESULTS: FT4 was significantly lower in KS vs non-KS. KS and non-KS presented similar TSH and testosterone levels. Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) was diagnosed in 7% of KS. Five KS developed hypothyroidism. The ratio FT3/FT4 was similar in both groups. TSH index was 1.9 in KS and 2.3 in non-KS. Adjustment for differences in age, sample size and concomitant disease in multivariate models did not alter the results. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated in KS no etiopathogenic link to hypogonadism or change in the set point of thyrotrophic control in the altered FT4 production. The prevalence of HT in KS was similar to normal male population, showing absence of increased risk of HT associated with the XXY karyotype.

Thyroid Function in Klinefelter Syndrome: A Multicentre Study From KING Group

RA Condorelli;AE Calogero;S La Vignera
2019

Abstract

PURPOSE: The prevalence and the etiopathogenesis of thyroid dysfunctions in Klinefelter syndrome (KS) are still unclear. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenetic role of hypogonadism in the thyroid disorders described in KS, with the scope to distinguish between patients with KS and hypogonadism due to other causes (Kallmann syndrome, idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, iatrogenic hypogonadism and acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism after surgical removal of pituitary adenomas) called non-KS. Therefore, we evaluated thyroid function in KS and in non-KS hypogonadal patients. METHODS: This is a case-control multicentre study from KING group: Endocrinology clinics in university-affiliated medical centres. One hundred and seventy four KS, and sixty-two non-KS hypogonadal men were enrolled. The primary outcome was the prevalence of thyroid diseases in KS and in non-KS. Changes in hormonal parameters were evaluated. Exclusion criterion was secondary hypothyroidism. Analyses were performed using Student's t test. Mann-Whitney test and Chi-square test. RESULTS: FT4 was significantly lower in KS vs non-KS. KS and non-KS presented similar TSH and testosterone levels. Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) was diagnosed in 7% of KS. Five KS developed hypothyroidism. The ratio FT3/FT4 was similar in both groups. TSH index was 1.9 in KS and 2.3 in non-KS. Adjustment for differences in age, sample size and concomitant disease in multivariate models did not alter the results. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated in KS no etiopathogenic link to hypogonadism or change in the set point of thyrotrophic control in the altered FT4 production. The prevalence of HT in KS was similar to normal male population, showing absence of increased risk of HT associated with the XXY karyotype.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/373770
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