In summer 2009 a high resolution magnetic survey was executed inside the archaeological park of Egnazia (Southern Italy) for the subsurface mapping of buried features (" invisible archaeology" ). Furthermore, a database was implemented in order to collect already-published data concerning the important excavated areas (" visible archaeology" ). The magnetic maps provided a detailed plan as well as the geometry of the subterranean structures: with the aim of exploiting at best the capability of this important information, geophysical data were inserted into a Geographical Information System (GIS) comprising both other available spatial data (satellite image, aerial oblique photos, etc...) and some records of the database (i.e. photos of the main excavated structures, short descriptions, archaeological monographs, etc...). The information system, which was emulated and shared online at www.gisonda.it, supplies a synoptic multi-layered view of the area where the visible and invisible archaeology show their mutual relationships and the complex interactions both with elements of the landscape and the actual human activities (i.e. the modern road network, the coast line, etc...). Within this integrated information tool, the " invisible archaeology" detected through the non invasive survey, offers fundamental information to improve the scientific knowledge on the ancient settlement in a landscape framework. At the same time, it appears clear how remotely-sensed data revealing the presence of buried features can play a strategic role both in the decision-making process and local policies, thus rendering the Archaeological Heritage (AH) management more effective in terms of scientific, social and economic assets. This important challenge could be better achieved if all the information gained were shared and accessible (in a free and/or protected mode) to whoever interested (archaeologists, universities and research institutions, superintendeces, public administrations, private enterprises, etc.). The actual work represents a pilot project aimed at extending systematically the above described activities to the study and management of AH in the whole Apulia region. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

Online non destructive archaeology; the archaeological park of Egnazia (Southern Italy) study case

Caggiani M. C.;
2012

Abstract

In summer 2009 a high resolution magnetic survey was executed inside the archaeological park of Egnazia (Southern Italy) for the subsurface mapping of buried features (" invisible archaeology" ). Furthermore, a database was implemented in order to collect already-published data concerning the important excavated areas (" visible archaeology" ). The magnetic maps provided a detailed plan as well as the geometry of the subterranean structures: with the aim of exploiting at best the capability of this important information, geophysical data were inserted into a Geographical Information System (GIS) comprising both other available spatial data (satellite image, aerial oblique photos, etc...) and some records of the database (i.e. photos of the main excavated structures, short descriptions, archaeological monographs, etc...). The information system, which was emulated and shared online at www.gisonda.it, supplies a synoptic multi-layered view of the area where the visible and invisible archaeology show their mutual relationships and the complex interactions both with elements of the landscape and the actual human activities (i.e. the modern road network, the coast line, etc...). Within this integrated information tool, the " invisible archaeology" detected through the non invasive survey, offers fundamental information to improve the scientific knowledge on the ancient settlement in a landscape framework. At the same time, it appears clear how remotely-sensed data revealing the presence of buried features can play a strategic role both in the decision-making process and local policies, thus rendering the Archaeological Heritage (AH) management more effective in terms of scientific, social and economic assets. This important challenge could be better achieved if all the information gained were shared and accessible (in a free and/or protected mode) to whoever interested (archaeologists, universities and research institutions, superintendeces, public administrations, private enterprises, etc.). The actual work represents a pilot project aimed at extending systematically the above described activities to the study and management of AH in the whole Apulia region. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Archaeological heritage management; Database; Egnazia; Magnetometry; Southern Italy; Web information system
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/385282
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