Current research in High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics touches onfundamental questions regarding the origin of cosmic rays, theircomposition, the acceleration mechanisms, and their production.Unambiguous measurements of the energy spectra and of the composition ofcosmic rays at the ``knee'' region could provide some of the answersto the above questions. So far only ground based observations, whichrely on sophisticated models describing high energy interactions in theEarth's atmosphere, have been possible due to the extremely low particlerates at these energies.A calorimetry based space experiment that could provide not only fluxmeasurements but also energy spectra and particle identification, wouldcertainly overcome some of the uncertainties of ground basedexperiments. Given the expected particle fluxes, a very large acceptanceis needed to collect a sufficient quantity of data, in a time compatiblewith the duration of a space mission. This in turn, contrasts with thelightness and compactness requirements for space based experiments.We present a novel idea in calorimetry which addresses these issueswhilst limiting the mass and volume of the detector. In this paper wereport on a four year R&D program where we investigated materials,coatings, photo-sensors, Front End electronics, and mechanicalstructures with the aim of designing a high performance, highgranularity calorimeter with the largest possible acceptance. Detailsare given of the design choices, component characterisation, and of theconstruction of a sizeable prototype (Calocube) which has been used invarious tests with particle beams.

The CALOCUBE project for a space based cosmic ray experiment: design, construction, and first performance of a high granularity calorimeter prototype

Albergo, S.;Cappello, G.;Tricomi, A.;
2019

Abstract

Current research in High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics touches onfundamental questions regarding the origin of cosmic rays, theircomposition, the acceleration mechanisms, and their production.Unambiguous measurements of the energy spectra and of the composition ofcosmic rays at the ``knee'' region could provide some of the answersto the above questions. So far only ground based observations, whichrely on sophisticated models describing high energy interactions in theEarth's atmosphere, have been possible due to the extremely low particlerates at these energies.A calorimetry based space experiment that could provide not only fluxmeasurements but also energy spectra and particle identification, wouldcertainly overcome some of the uncertainties of ground basedexperiments. Given the expected particle fluxes, a very large acceptanceis needed to collect a sufficient quantity of data, in a time compatiblewith the duration of a space mission. This in turn, contrasts with thelightness and compactness requirements for space based experiments.We present a novel idea in calorimetry which addresses these issueswhilst limiting the mass and volume of the detector. In this paper wereport on a four year R&D program where we investigated materials,coatings, photo-sensors, Front End electronics, and mechanicalstructures with the aim of designing a high performance, highgranularity calorimeter with the largest possible acceptance. Detailsare given of the design choices, component characterisation, and of theconstruction of a sizeable prototype (Calocube) which has been used invarious tests with particle beams.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/390528
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