INTRODUCTION: The success of renal transplantation as a treatment for end-stage renal disease has created a chronic shortage of donor organs. We present our initial experience in transplanting kidneys from hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg)-positive donors into HbsAg-positive recipients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From January 2002 to March 2004, 5 patients with end-stage renal disease, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and HbsAg seropositivity underwent a kidney transplantation from a cadaveric HbsAg-positive donor. The median time on the waiting list was 8 months, compared with the median of 3 years on the national waiting list. RESULTS: One patient experienced an acute rejection; 1 patient had an increase in serum level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with no signs of recurrence of hepatitis. Graft and patient survival at a median follow-up of 12 months was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Although the number of patients is small and the follow-up is short, our results suggest that HbsAg-positive donors can be considered as an alternative donor source because their kidneys are allocated to the matched serology-positive recipients, shortening their time on the waiting list.

Introduction. The success of renal transplantation as a treatment for end-stage renal disease has created a chronic shortage of donor organs. We present our initial experience in transplanting kidneys from hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg)-positive donors into HbsAg-positive recipients. Material and Methods. From January 2002 to March 2004, 5 patients with end-stage renal disease, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and HbsAg seropositivity underwent a kidney transplantation from a cadaveric HbsAg-positive donor. The median time on the waiting list was 8 months, compared with the median of 3 years on the national waiting list. Results. One patient experienced an acute rejection; I patient had an increase in serum level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with no signs of recurrence of hepatits. Graft and patient survival at a median follow-up of 12 months was 100%. Conclusions. Although the number of patients is small and the follow-up is short, our results suggest that HbsAg-positive donors can be considered as an alternative donor source because their kidneys are allocated to the matched serology-positive recipients, shortening their time on the waiting list.

Kidney transplantation from hepatitis B surface antigen-positive donors into hepatitis B surface antigen-positive recipients: Preliminary findings

VEROUX, Massimiliano;VEROUX, Pierfrancesco
2005

Abstract

Introduction. The success of renal transplantation as a treatment for end-stage renal disease has created a chronic shortage of donor organs. We present our initial experience in transplanting kidneys from hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg)-positive donors into HbsAg-positive recipients. Material and Methods. From January 2002 to March 2004, 5 patients with end-stage renal disease, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and HbsAg seropositivity underwent a kidney transplantation from a cadaveric HbsAg-positive donor. The median time on the waiting list was 8 months, compared with the median of 3 years on the national waiting list. Results. One patient experienced an acute rejection; I patient had an increase in serum level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with no signs of recurrence of hepatits. Graft and patient survival at a median follow-up of 12 months was 100%. Conclusions. Although the number of patients is small and the follow-up is short, our results suggest that HbsAg-positive donors can be considered as an alternative donor source because their kidneys are allocated to the matched serology-positive recipients, shortening their time on the waiting list.
INTRODUCTION: The success of renal transplantation as a treatment for end-stage renal disease has created a chronic shortage of donor organs. We present our initial experience in transplanting kidneys from hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg)-positive donors into HbsAg-positive recipients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From January 2002 to March 2004, 5 patients with end-stage renal disease, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and HbsAg seropositivity underwent a kidney transplantation from a cadaveric HbsAg-positive donor. The median time on the waiting list was 8 months, compared with the median of 3 years on the national waiting list. RESULTS: One patient experienced an acute rejection; 1 patient had an increase in serum level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with no signs of recurrence of hepatitis. Graft and patient survival at a median follow-up of 12 months was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Although the number of patients is small and the follow-up is short, our results suggest that HbsAg-positive donors can be considered as an alternative donor source because their kidneys are allocated to the matched serology-positive recipients, shortening their time on the waiting list.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/45017
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 12
social impact