The use of hydrogeophysical methods provides insights for supporting optimal irrigation design and management. In the present study, the electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) was applied for monitoring the soil water motion patterns resulting from the adoption of water deficit scenarios in a micro-irrigated orange orchard (Eastern Sicily, Italy). The relationship of ERI with independent ancillary data of soil water content (SWC), plant transpiration (T) and in situ measurements of hydraulic conductivity at saturation (Ks, i.e., using the falling head method, FH) was evaluated. The soil water motion patterns and the maximum wet depths in the soil profile identified by ERI were quite dependent on SWC (R2 = 0.79 and 0.82, respectively). Moreover, ERI was able to detect T in the severe deficit irrigation treatment (electrical resistivity increases of about 20%), whereas this phenomenon was masked at higher SWC conditions. Ks rates derived from ERI and FH approaches revealed different patterns and magnitudes among the irrigation treatments, as consequence of their different measurement scales and the methodological specificity. Finally, ERI has been proved suitable for identifying the soil wetting/drying patterns and the geometrical characteristics of wet bulbs, which represent some of the most influential variables for the optimal design and management of micro-irrigation systems.

Electrical resistivity imaging for monitoring soil water motion patterns under different drip irrigation scenarios

Vanella D.
;
Sacco A.;Longo Minnolo G.;Cirelli G. L.;Consoli S.
2021-01-01

Abstract

The use of hydrogeophysical methods provides insights for supporting optimal irrigation design and management. In the present study, the electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) was applied for monitoring the soil water motion patterns resulting from the adoption of water deficit scenarios in a micro-irrigated orange orchard (Eastern Sicily, Italy). The relationship of ERI with independent ancillary data of soil water content (SWC), plant transpiration (T) and in situ measurements of hydraulic conductivity at saturation (Ks, i.e., using the falling head method, FH) was evaluated. The soil water motion patterns and the maximum wet depths in the soil profile identified by ERI were quite dependent on SWC (R2 = 0.79 and 0.82, respectively). Moreover, ERI was able to detect T in the severe deficit irrigation treatment (electrical resistivity increases of about 20%), whereas this phenomenon was masked at higher SWC conditions. Ks rates derived from ERI and FH approaches revealed different patterns and magnitudes among the irrigation treatments, as consequence of their different measurement scales and the methodological specificity. Finally, ERI has been proved suitable for identifying the soil wetting/drying patterns and the geometrical characteristics of wet bulbs, which represent some of the most influential variables for the optimal design and management of micro-irrigation systems.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/483539
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