Introduction. The demand for kidney transplants and the improvement in recipient outcomes over the last years have stimulated surgeons to expand the criteria for usable donor organs, by accepting older patients to expand their donor pool. We herein report our experience with kidney transplants from donors aged older than 60 years, who have been declined by other transplantation centers. Patients and Methods. Sixty kidney transplantations were performed with grafts procured from donors aged older than 60 years. Forty-five patients received a single kidney graft (SKG) and 15 received a dual kidney graft (DKG). Mean donor age was 62 years for SKG and 64 years for DKG. Double kidney transplantations were performed with the ipsilateral allocation of both grafts. Results. No primary graft nonfunction occurred. Delayed graft function was observed in 22 SKG (48.8%) and in 7 DKG (46.6%). Acute rejection rates were 9% for SKG and 0% for DKG. One-year patient survival rates were 95% and 100% for SKG and DKG, respectively. Mean serum creatinine levels at 1-year posttransplantation were 1.9 mg/dL for SKG and 1.3 mg/dL for DKG. There were no surgical postoperative complications and mortality. Death censored 1-year graft survival rate was 88% for SKG and 94% for DKG. Conclusions. Our experience with marginal donors who have been declined by other transplantation centers has demonstrated that such organs, with accurate selection criteria, could be safely allocated to elderly recipients with no increase in postoperative complications, guaranteeing satisfactory results in the short and medium term, allowing a significant improvement in the number of transplants.

Kidney transplantation from cadaveric donors unsuitable for other centers and older than 60 years of age

VEROUX, Pierfrancesco;VEROUX, Massimiliano;
2005-01-01

Abstract

Introduction. The demand for kidney transplants and the improvement in recipient outcomes over the last years have stimulated surgeons to expand the criteria for usable donor organs, by accepting older patients to expand their donor pool. We herein report our experience with kidney transplants from donors aged older than 60 years, who have been declined by other transplantation centers. Patients and Methods. Sixty kidney transplantations were performed with grafts procured from donors aged older than 60 years. Forty-five patients received a single kidney graft (SKG) and 15 received a dual kidney graft (DKG). Mean donor age was 62 years for SKG and 64 years for DKG. Double kidney transplantations were performed with the ipsilateral allocation of both grafts. Results. No primary graft nonfunction occurred. Delayed graft function was observed in 22 SKG (48.8%) and in 7 DKG (46.6%). Acute rejection rates were 9% for SKG and 0% for DKG. One-year patient survival rates were 95% and 100% for SKG and DKG, respectively. Mean serum creatinine levels at 1-year posttransplantation were 1.9 mg/dL for SKG and 1.3 mg/dL for DKG. There were no surgical postoperative complications and mortality. Death censored 1-year graft survival rate was 88% for SKG and 94% for DKG. Conclusions. Our experience with marginal donors who have been declined by other transplantation centers has demonstrated that such organs, with accurate selection criteria, could be safely allocated to elderly recipients with no increase in postoperative complications, guaranteeing satisfactory results in the short and medium term, allowing a significant improvement in the number of transplants.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/49097
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