Traditionally, duplicating handmade artefacts was done primarily by moulds. To obtain multiples of the casts, the artisan laid out a layer of clay over the mould and pressed on it strongly to make sure of thorough contact. The moulds found by excavation show wear due to compression and deterioration over time. They often disintegrate and are unusable. Consequently, understanding and studying the images they contain is only possible when the moulds are re-useable for casts which, to date, are carried out in restoration laboratories by traditional techniques. It should be noted that apart from the casts’ shrinking, moulds are also subject to altered sizes and morphologies after extraction from the archetype and therefore at the end of the production line the cast image is all the more blurred due to a loss of detail. This study describes a multidisciplinary approach applied to two clay moulds from classical antiquity that differ in size and shape, and the casts they produce using traditional techniques. Using Reverse Engineering (RE) by 3D laser scanning, a computer-based method was applied to study their morphometric relationship only obtainable in a virtual environment without compromising the integrity of the physical models. Furthermore, the digitalised moulds have provided virtual casts without significant size alterations for the aims of this work, making them ‘ideal’ casts. These last casts were then converted by Rapid Prototyping (RP) into physical prototypes which have negligible geometric errors for making multiple replicas for educational or exhibition purposes. In archaeology, this method offers researchers the opportunity to study and acquire morphological data which the moulds themselves cannot, nor can their casts. So, it is possible to go back in time to images which match their archetypes even without their casts. More detailed knowledge about the form of an art object is important for its study, conservation and how it was produced. So, ancient clay moulds are studied particularly in investigating methods of mass production, their social value and the degree of specialisation of those ancient societies.

A computer-based method to reproduce and analyse ancient series-produced moulded artefacts

Sequenzia G.
Primo
;
Oliveri S. M.
Ultimo
2021-01-01

Abstract

Traditionally, duplicating handmade artefacts was done primarily by moulds. To obtain multiples of the casts, the artisan laid out a layer of clay over the mould and pressed on it strongly to make sure of thorough contact. The moulds found by excavation show wear due to compression and deterioration over time. They often disintegrate and are unusable. Consequently, understanding and studying the images they contain is only possible when the moulds are re-useable for casts which, to date, are carried out in restoration laboratories by traditional techniques. It should be noted that apart from the casts’ shrinking, moulds are also subject to altered sizes and morphologies after extraction from the archetype and therefore at the end of the production line the cast image is all the more blurred due to a loss of detail. This study describes a multidisciplinary approach applied to two clay moulds from classical antiquity that differ in size and shape, and the casts they produce using traditional techniques. Using Reverse Engineering (RE) by 3D laser scanning, a computer-based method was applied to study their morphometric relationship only obtainable in a virtual environment without compromising the integrity of the physical models. Furthermore, the digitalised moulds have provided virtual casts without significant size alterations for the aims of this work, making them ‘ideal’ casts. These last casts were then converted by Rapid Prototyping (RP) into physical prototypes which have negligible geometric errors for making multiple replicas for educational or exhibition purposes. In archaeology, this method offers researchers the opportunity to study and acquire morphological data which the moulds themselves cannot, nor can their casts. So, it is possible to go back in time to images which match their archetypes even without their casts. More detailed knowledge about the form of an art object is important for its study, conservation and how it was produced. So, ancient clay moulds are studied particularly in investigating methods of mass production, their social value and the degree of specialisation of those ancient societies.
3D laser scanning
3D technology in archaeology
Ancient mould
Cultural heritage survey
Morphometric analysis
Virtual model
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/502353
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