Light elements offer a unique opportunity for studying several astrophysical scenarios from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis to stellar physics. Understanding the stellar abundances of light elements is key to obtaining information on internal stellar structures and mixing phenomena in different evolutionary phases, such as the pre-main-sequence, main-sequence or red-giant branch. In such a case, light elements, i.e., lithium, beryllium and boron, are usually burnt at temperatures of the order of 2-5 x 10(6) K. Consequently, the astrophysical S(E)-factor and the reaction rate of the nuclear reactions responsible for the burning of such elements must be measured and evaluated at ultra-low energies (between 0 and 10 keV). The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is an experimental technique that allows us to perform this kind of measurements avoiding uncertainties due to the extrapolation and electron screening effects on direct data. A long Trojan Horse Method research program has been devoted to the measurement of light element burning cross sections at astrophysical energies. In addition, dedicated direct measurements have been performed using both in-beam spectroscopy and the activation technique. In this review we will report the details of these experimental measurements and the results in terms of S(E)-factor, reaction rate and electron screening potential. A comparison between astrophysical reaction rates evaluated here and the literature will also be given.

Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics With the Light Elements Li, Be and B: A Review

Rapisarda, GG;Lamia, L;Palmerini, S;Romano, S;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Light elements offer a unique opportunity for studying several astrophysical scenarios from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis to stellar physics. Understanding the stellar abundances of light elements is key to obtaining information on internal stellar structures and mixing phenomena in different evolutionary phases, such as the pre-main-sequence, main-sequence or red-giant branch. In such a case, light elements, i.e., lithium, beryllium and boron, are usually burnt at temperatures of the order of 2-5 x 10(6) K. Consequently, the astrophysical S(E)-factor and the reaction rate of the nuclear reactions responsible for the burning of such elements must be measured and evaluated at ultra-low energies (between 0 and 10 keV). The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is an experimental technique that allows us to perform this kind of measurements avoiding uncertainties due to the extrapolation and electron screening effects on direct data. A long Trojan Horse Method research program has been devoted to the measurement of light element burning cross sections at astrophysical energies. In addition, dedicated direct measurements have been performed using both in-beam spectroscopy and the activation technique. In this review we will report the details of these experimental measurements and the results in terms of S(E)-factor, reaction rate and electron screening potential. A comparison between astrophysical reaction rates evaluated here and the literature will also be given.
nuclear astrophysics
nuclear reactions
activation method
reaction rate
nucleosynthesis
electron screening effect
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/505484
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