OBJECTIVE No consensus exists on the best treatment for recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG), particularly in terms of surgical indications, and scant data are available on the integrated use of multiple technologies to overcome intraoperative limits and pitfalls related to artifacts secondary to previous surgery and radiotherapy. Here, the authors report on their experience with the integration of multiple intraoperative tools in recurrent HGG surgery, analyzing their pros and cons as well as their effectiveness in increasing the extent of tumor resection. In addition, they present a review of the relevant literature on this topic. METHODS The authors reviewed all cases in which recurrent HGG had been histologically diagnosed after a first surgery and the patient had undergone a second surgery involving neuronavigation with MRI, intraoperative CT (iCT), 11C-methionine–positron emission tomography (11C-MET-PET), 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM), and intraoperative navigated ultrasound (iUS). All cases were classified according to tumor functional grade (1, noneloquent area; 2, near an eloquent area; 3, eloquent area). RESULTS Twenty patients with recurrent HGG were operated on using a multimodal protocol. The recurrent tumor functional grade was 1 in 4 patients, 2 in 8 patients, and 3 in the remaining 8 patients. In all patients but 2, 100% EOTR was obtained. Intraoperative 5-ALA fluorescence and navigated iUS showed low specificity and sensitivity. iCT detected tumor remnants in 3 cases. Postoperatively, 6 patients (30%) had worsening neurological conditions: 4 recovered within 90 days, 1 partially recovered, and 1 experienced a permanent deficit. The median Karnofsky Performance Status remained substantially unchanged over the follow-up period. The mean progression-free survival after the second surgery was 7.7 months (range 2–11 months). The mean overall survival was 25.4 months (range 10–52 months), excluding 2 long survivors. Two patients died within 60 days after surgery, and 3 patients were still under follow-up at the end of this study. CONCLUSIONS This is the first study reporting the integration of neuronavigation, 5-ALA fluorescence, iUS, iCT, 11CMET-PET, and IOM during microsurgical resection of recurrent glioma. The authors believe that the proposed multimodal protocol is useful to increase the safety, effectiveness, and EOTR in patients with recurrent HGG and brain alterations secondary to radio- and chemotherapy. https://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2020.10.FOCUS20744

Recurrent high-grade glioma surgery: a multimodal intraoperative protocol to safely increase extent of tumor resection and analysis of its impact on patient outcome

Barbagallo G. M. V.;Certo F.;Peschillo S.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVE No consensus exists on the best treatment for recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG), particularly in terms of surgical indications, and scant data are available on the integrated use of multiple technologies to overcome intraoperative limits and pitfalls related to artifacts secondary to previous surgery and radiotherapy. Here, the authors report on their experience with the integration of multiple intraoperative tools in recurrent HGG surgery, analyzing their pros and cons as well as their effectiveness in increasing the extent of tumor resection. In addition, they present a review of the relevant literature on this topic. METHODS The authors reviewed all cases in which recurrent HGG had been histologically diagnosed after a first surgery and the patient had undergone a second surgery involving neuronavigation with MRI, intraoperative CT (iCT), 11C-methionine–positron emission tomography (11C-MET-PET), 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM), and intraoperative navigated ultrasound (iUS). All cases were classified according to tumor functional grade (1, noneloquent area; 2, near an eloquent area; 3, eloquent area). RESULTS Twenty patients with recurrent HGG were operated on using a multimodal protocol. The recurrent tumor functional grade was 1 in 4 patients, 2 in 8 patients, and 3 in the remaining 8 patients. In all patients but 2, 100% EOTR was obtained. Intraoperative 5-ALA fluorescence and navigated iUS showed low specificity and sensitivity. iCT detected tumor remnants in 3 cases. Postoperatively, 6 patients (30%) had worsening neurological conditions: 4 recovered within 90 days, 1 partially recovered, and 1 experienced a permanent deficit. The median Karnofsky Performance Status remained substantially unchanged over the follow-up period. The mean progression-free survival after the second surgery was 7.7 months (range 2–11 months). The mean overall survival was 25.4 months (range 10–52 months), excluding 2 long survivors. Two patients died within 60 days after surgery, and 3 patients were still under follow-up at the end of this study. CONCLUSIONS This is the first study reporting the integration of neuronavigation, 5-ALA fluorescence, iUS, iCT, 11CMET-PET, and IOM during microsurgical resection of recurrent glioma. The authors believe that the proposed multimodal protocol is useful to increase the safety, effectiveness, and EOTR in patients with recurrent HGG and brain alterations secondary to radio- and chemotherapy. https://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2020.10.FOCUS20744
2021
5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence
11
C-MET-PET
glioma recurrence surgery
intraoperative computed tomography
intraoperative ultrasound
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/505606
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