Background and objectives: The epidemiology and distribution of pediatric fractures change over time and are influenced by a multitude of factors including geography, climate, and population characteristics. The aims of our work were to study the distribution of traumatic pediatric orthopedic injuries admitted to the Lille University Hospital (LUH) Pediatric Emergency Department in 1999 and in 2019 and to analyze the epidemiological differences 20 years apart. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective, comparative, monocentric, and epidemiological study involving all children between 0 and 15 years and 3 months of age who consulted the pediatric emergencies of LUH from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 1999 and from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019. On admission, the following data were collected: sex, age at the time of injury, month and time of the day the trauma occurred (4:00 a.m to 11:59 a.m, 12:00 p.m. to 19:59 p.m, and 20:00 p.m to 3:59 a.m.), mechanism of injury, laterality (right or left), anatomical location, type of injury, and whether the fracture was closed or open. The type of treatment (orthopedic or surgical) was collected from the medical records. Results: A total of 939 children were included in 1999 compared with 781 in 2019 (21% decrease); the average age of children with fractures was significantly higher in 1999 (8.81 years) than in 2019 (7.19 years). This difference was explained by the majority involvement of older children (10–15 years) in 1999 (43% of fractures in 1999 versus 25% of fractures in 2019). Conversely, small children (1–5 years) had significantly more fractures in 2019 (36%) than in 1999 (24%). Conclusions: Overall, the types and sites of fractures did not change over the studied time despite a change in the population and mechanism of injury. This suggested that the reflexes of breaking a fall still tended to implicate and damage the same bone segments. Finally, the proportion of fractures managed surgically versus orthopedically has not evolved since 1999. Exploring this is a possible area of further research that would complement our study.

Clinical Characteristics and Distribution of Pediatric Fractures at a Tertiary Hospital in Northern France: A 20-Year-Distance Comparative Analysis (1999–2019)

Sapienza M.;Pavone V.;
2022

Abstract

Background and objectives: The epidemiology and distribution of pediatric fractures change over time and are influenced by a multitude of factors including geography, climate, and population characteristics. The aims of our work were to study the distribution of traumatic pediatric orthopedic injuries admitted to the Lille University Hospital (LUH) Pediatric Emergency Department in 1999 and in 2019 and to analyze the epidemiological differences 20 years apart. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective, comparative, monocentric, and epidemiological study involving all children between 0 and 15 years and 3 months of age who consulted the pediatric emergencies of LUH from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 1999 and from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019. On admission, the following data were collected: sex, age at the time of injury, month and time of the day the trauma occurred (4:00 a.m to 11:59 a.m, 12:00 p.m. to 19:59 p.m, and 20:00 p.m to 3:59 a.m.), mechanism of injury, laterality (right or left), anatomical location, type of injury, and whether the fracture was closed or open. The type of treatment (orthopedic or surgical) was collected from the medical records. Results: A total of 939 children were included in 1999 compared with 781 in 2019 (21% decrease); the average age of children with fractures was significantly higher in 1999 (8.81 years) than in 2019 (7.19 years). This difference was explained by the majority involvement of older children (10–15 years) in 1999 (43% of fractures in 1999 versus 25% of fractures in 2019). Conversely, small children (1–5 years) had significantly more fractures in 2019 (36%) than in 1999 (24%). Conclusions: Overall, the types and sites of fractures did not change over the studied time despite a change in the population and mechanism of injury. This suggested that the reflexes of breaking a fall still tended to implicate and damage the same bone segments. Finally, the proportion of fractures managed surgically versus orthopedically has not evolved since 1999. Exploring this is a possible area of further research that would complement our study.
children
epidemiology
fractures
time trend
traumatology
Accidental Falls
Adolescent
Child
Hospitals, University
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Tertiary Care Centers
Fractures, Bone
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/534603
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