Introduction: Although anemia is not regarded as an usual vascular risk factor for stroke, it is one of the potential mechanism by which the brain does not re-ceive adequate oxygenation. Moreover, the relation-ship between drop of hemoglobin and acute focal neurological deficits is not clear. We report two pa-tients with cerebral infarction due to acute anemia. Case Reports: Case 1 was a 73-year-old man who complained an episode of loss of consciousness fol-lowed by right hemiparesis and dysarthria after few hours. The day after admission he presented melena caused by a duodenal ulcer bleeding. The hemoglo- bin dropped from 11.3 g/dl to 5.6 g/dl in 24 hours. Areas of acute infarctions were evident at diffusion- weighted imaging (DWI) of the brain. Case 2 was a 77-year-old man with a transient episode of aphasia, right lower limb paresis and mental confusion twelve hours after an intervention of PTA and stenting of the left internal carotid artery. Hemoglobin was 11.8 g/dl before intervention and 9 g/dl 48 hours later. DWI showed bilateral and widespread acute infarcts. Con-clusion: Anemia has to be considered as a potential factor in determining or worsening cerebral infarc-tion, especially in patients with carotid or intracranial stenosis, high cerebrovascular lesions load or insuffi-cient collateral supply. Acute or severe anemia may negatively impact the cerebral blood flow and de-crease oxygen-carrying capacity, promote rapid dete-rioration of ischemic penumbra. Brain DWI and treatment of the underlying etiology of acute anemia are crucial in early identification and recovery of cerebral infarctions.

Focal neurological deficit in acute anemia: Case reports and review of the literature

Salvatore Giuffrida
Primo
;
Daniela Modica;Manuela Pennisi;Alfio Catalano;BELLA, Rita;Giovanni Pennisi;Carolin Cornelius
Penultimo
;
Giuseppe Lanza
Ultimo
2013

Abstract

Introduction: Although anemia is not regarded as an usual vascular risk factor for stroke, it is one of the potential mechanism by which the brain does not re-ceive adequate oxygenation. Moreover, the relation-ship between drop of hemoglobin and acute focal neurological deficits is not clear. We report two pa-tients with cerebral infarction due to acute anemia. Case Reports: Case 1 was a 73-year-old man who complained an episode of loss of consciousness fol-lowed by right hemiparesis and dysarthria after few hours. The day after admission he presented melena caused by a duodenal ulcer bleeding. The hemoglo- bin dropped from 11.3 g/dl to 5.6 g/dl in 24 hours. Areas of acute infarctions were evident at diffusion- weighted imaging (DWI) of the brain. Case 2 was a 77-year-old man with a transient episode of aphasia, right lower limb paresis and mental confusion twelve hours after an intervention of PTA and stenting of the left internal carotid artery. Hemoglobin was 11.8 g/dl before intervention and 9 g/dl 48 hours later. DWI showed bilateral and widespread acute infarcts. Con-clusion: Anemia has to be considered as a potential factor in determining or worsening cerebral infarc-tion, especially in patients with carotid or intracranial stenosis, high cerebrovascular lesions load or insuffi-cient collateral supply. Acute or severe anemia may negatively impact the cerebral blood flow and de-crease oxygen-carrying capacity, promote rapid dete-rioration of ischemic penumbra. Brain DWI and treatment of the underlying etiology of acute anemia are crucial in early identification and recovery of cerebral infarctions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/53611
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