Background: The benefits of laparoscopic surgery are well known. However, clinic and metabolic consequences of pneumoperitoneum, achieved by insufflation of gas carbon dioxide, are still debated. Cardiovascular system suffering due to the compression of intra-abdominal venous structures can cause life-threatening complications. Increased partial pressure of carbon dioxide induces metabolic acidosis with further vascular suffering. Pneu-moperitoneum reduces the pulmonary exchange volumes and bring renal suffering.Methods: The aim of this study is to evaluate the alterations in hemodynamic and hemogasanalysis parameters during the laparoscopic surgery at different pressure settings of pneumoperitoneum in order to assess the best pressure value. We evaluated and compared intraoperative hemodynamic and hemogasanalytic alterations in two groups of patients respectively subdue to laparoscopic cholecystectomy at a pneumoperitoneum pressure of 12 mmHg (group A) and at a pressure of 8 mmHg (group B).Results: In both groups, after the induction of anesthesia we observed a flexion in the heart rate, with no sig-nificant difference between the two groups. During the intervention, group A showed a significantly higher respiratory rate than the group B. The average blood pressure decreased mostly in group B. The oxygen satu-ration increased at the end of the procedure in group A, more than in the group B. The pH value was higher in group B. The hydrogen carbonate ion settled at lower levels in group A. Conclusion: Although significant differences between the two groups were appreciated on several parameters, they were never of such magnitude to prefer the induction of pneumoperitoneum at 8 mmHg.

Laparoscopic surgery: A randomised controlled trial comparing intraoperative hemodynamic parameters and arterial-blood gas changes at two different pneumoperitoneal pressure values

Eva, Intagliata;Rosario, Vecchio;Guglielmo, Rosolia;Clarissa, Vizzini;Federica, Lo Presti;Emma, Cacciola;Rosaria, Cacciola Rossella;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: The benefits of laparoscopic surgery are well known. However, clinic and metabolic consequences of pneumoperitoneum, achieved by insufflation of gas carbon dioxide, are still debated. Cardiovascular system suffering due to the compression of intra-abdominal venous structures can cause life-threatening complications. Increased partial pressure of carbon dioxide induces metabolic acidosis with further vascular suffering. Pneu-moperitoneum reduces the pulmonary exchange volumes and bring renal suffering.Methods: The aim of this study is to evaluate the alterations in hemodynamic and hemogasanalysis parameters during the laparoscopic surgery at different pressure settings of pneumoperitoneum in order to assess the best pressure value. We evaluated and compared intraoperative hemodynamic and hemogasanalytic alterations in two groups of patients respectively subdue to laparoscopic cholecystectomy at a pneumoperitoneum pressure of 12 mmHg (group A) and at a pressure of 8 mmHg (group B).Results: In both groups, after the induction of anesthesia we observed a flexion in the heart rate, with no sig-nificant difference between the two groups. During the intervention, group A showed a significantly higher respiratory rate than the group B. The average blood pressure decreased mostly in group B. The oxygen satu-ration increased at the end of the procedure in group A, more than in the group B. The pH value was higher in group B. The hydrogen carbonate ion settled at lower levels in group A. Conclusion: Although significant differences between the two groups were appreciated on several parameters, they were never of such magnitude to prefer the induction of pneumoperitoneum at 8 mmHg.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/537077
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