Abstract: Background: The number of cancer survivors continues to increase, thanks to advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, the incidence of a second primary cancer (SPC) is also increasing, but limited studies reporting incidence data are available regarding multiple cancers. This study presents our observations on multiple primary malignant cancers, the associations between sites, and the inherent sex differences. Patients and methods: We report the data, disaggregated by sex, concerning the SPCs that were recorded in the “Registro Tumori Integrato” (RTI) a population‐based cancer registry in Sicily, Italy, as observed in the period from 2003 to 2017, in a total population of approximately 2,300,000. SPCs were divided into synchronous and metachronous cancers. The International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, third edition (ICD‐ O‐3), was used for topographical and morphological classifications. Multiple primary cancers with multi‐organ primitiveness were selected from the database of the RTI by extracting patients with more than one diagnosis. SPCs had different histology or morphology from the particular cancer that was considered to be the index cancer case. Multicenter or multifocal cancers, or metastases, were excluded. The percentages of cancer by sex and topography, the average age of incidence, and a breakdown by age were computed. Results: Differences were observed between sexes in terms of incidence and site for SPCs. The most frequent SPC was skin cancer (20% of the SPCs observed). The associations among sites of multiple cancers are reported. Conclusion: There are many gaps in our knowledge of sex differences in cancer. The study of multiple primary cancers could bring more likely opportunities for evaluation of the cancer burden and trends that can be used to identify new research areas by population health programs, as well as for clinical researchers.

Cancer Prevention for Survivors: Incidence of Second Primary Cancers and Sex Differences—A Population-Based Study from an Italian Cancer Registry

Ragusa, Rosalia
Primo
Conceptualization
;
Torrisi, Antonina
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Di Prima, Alessia Anna
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Torrisi, Antonietta A.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Ippolito, Antonella
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Ferrante, Margherita
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Madeddu, Anselmo
Penultimo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Guardabasso, Vincenzo
Ultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
2022

Abstract

Abstract: Background: The number of cancer survivors continues to increase, thanks to advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, the incidence of a second primary cancer (SPC) is also increasing, but limited studies reporting incidence data are available regarding multiple cancers. This study presents our observations on multiple primary malignant cancers, the associations between sites, and the inherent sex differences. Patients and methods: We report the data, disaggregated by sex, concerning the SPCs that were recorded in the “Registro Tumori Integrato” (RTI) a population‐based cancer registry in Sicily, Italy, as observed in the period from 2003 to 2017, in a total population of approximately 2,300,000. SPCs were divided into synchronous and metachronous cancers. The International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, third edition (ICD‐ O‐3), was used for topographical and morphological classifications. Multiple primary cancers with multi‐organ primitiveness were selected from the database of the RTI by extracting patients with more than one diagnosis. SPCs had different histology or morphology from the particular cancer that was considered to be the index cancer case. Multicenter or multifocal cancers, or metastases, were excluded. The percentages of cancer by sex and topography, the average age of incidence, and a breakdown by age were computed. Results: Differences were observed between sexes in terms of incidence and site for SPCs. The most frequent SPC was skin cancer (20% of the SPCs observed). The associations among sites of multiple cancers are reported. Conclusion: There are many gaps in our knowledge of sex differences in cancer. The study of multiple primary cancers could bring more likely opportunities for evaluation of the cancer burden and trends that can be used to identify new research areas by population health programs, as well as for clinical researchers.
second primary cancer, multiple primary cancer, cancer registry, sex differences, cancer prevention, cancer survivors
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/537963
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