Aim: To map the research methods, frameworks, structures, processes and outcomesinvestigated to date when implementing nursing bedside shift reports (BSRs).Background: BSRs have become an area of increased interest among nurse managers(NMs) with several projects aiming at implementing bedside reports also as a strategyto increase nursing surveillance and reduce adverse events. However, to date, nosummary of the available evidence has been provided with regard to research methods,theoretical frameworks underpinning BSR implementation and outcomes aimingat supporting NM decision-making in this field.Evaluation: A scoping review including quantitative studies written in English andretrieved from five databases was performed in 2018.Key issues: Twenty-two studies originating from USA, Australia, Finland and Sweden,largely monocentric in nature and involving mainly medical/surgery units, have beenperformed to date. BSR implementation has been conducted mainly under organisationalchange theories, patient safety and nursing conceptual models. The BSR outcomeshave been measured at the patient, nurse and organisational levels andreported positive trends.Conclusion: Professional reports—describing success transitions from traditionalmethods of handover to BSRs, and scientific studies aimed at improving evidence inthe field, have been conducted to date, in order to document BSR implementationprocesses and outcomes.Implications for Nursing Management: BSRs should be designed and conductedunder a theory of organisational change; moreover, clinical nurses should be trainedand supported in the transition from the traditional shift report to the BSR; whileimplementing this transition, outcomes should be set at the patient, nurses and organisationallevels with the aim of tracing the comprehensive effects of the change.

Bedside shift handover implementation quantitative evidence: Findings from a scoping review

Bulfone G;
2019

Abstract

Aim: To map the research methods, frameworks, structures, processes and outcomesinvestigated to date when implementing nursing bedside shift reports (BSRs).Background: BSRs have become an area of increased interest among nurse managers(NMs) with several projects aiming at implementing bedside reports also as a strategyto increase nursing surveillance and reduce adverse events. However, to date, nosummary of the available evidence has been provided with regard to research methods,theoretical frameworks underpinning BSR implementation and outcomes aimingat supporting NM decision-making in this field.Evaluation: A scoping review including quantitative studies written in English andretrieved from five databases was performed in 2018.Key issues: Twenty-two studies originating from USA, Australia, Finland and Sweden,largely monocentric in nature and involving mainly medical/surgery units, have beenperformed to date. BSR implementation has been conducted mainly under organisationalchange theories, patient safety and nursing conceptual models. The BSR outcomeshave been measured at the patient, nurse and organisational levels andreported positive trends.Conclusion: Professional reports—describing success transitions from traditionalmethods of handover to BSRs, and scientific studies aimed at improving evidence inthe field, have been conducted to date, in order to document BSR implementationprocesses and outcomes.Implications for Nursing Management: BSRs should be designed and conductedunder a theory of organisational change; moreover, clinical nurses should be trainedand supported in the transition from the traditional shift report to the BSR; whileimplementing this transition, outcomes should be set at the patient, nurses and organisationallevels with the aim of tracing the comprehensive effects of the change.
bedside handover, outcomes, quantitative studies, scoping review, shift report
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/538483
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 10
social impact