Background: A systemic inflammatory marker, the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS), could predict outcomes in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NIMBC). We aimed to investigate the predictive power of mGPS in oncological outcomes in HG/G3 T1 NMIBC patients undergoing Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) therapy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patient’s medical data from multicenter institutions. A total of 1382 patients with HG/G3 T1 NMIBC have been administered adjuvant intravesical BCG therapy, every week for 3 weeks given at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months. The analysis of mGPS for recurrence and progression was performed using multivariable and univariable Cox regression models. Results: During follow-up, 659 patients (47.68%) suffered recurrence, 441 (31.91%) suffered progression, 156 (11.28%) died of all causes, and 67 (4.84%) died of bladder cancer. At multivariable analysis, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio [hazard ratio (HR): 7.471; p = 0.0001] and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (HR: 0.706; p = 0.006 were significantly associated with recurrence. mGPS has no statistical significance for progression (p = 0.076). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in survival among patients from different mGPS subgroups. Five-year OS was 93% (CI 95% 92–94), in patients with mGPS 0, 82.2% (CI 95% 78.9–85.5) in patients with mGPS 1 and 78.1% (CI 95% 60.4–70) in mGPS 2 patients. Five-year CSS was 98% (CI 95% 97–99) in patients with mGPS 0, 90% (CI 95% 87–94) in patients with mGPS 1, and 100% in mGPS 2 patients. Limitations are applicable to a retrospective study. Conclusions: mGPS may have the potential to predict recurrence in HG/G3 T1 NMIBC patients, but more prospective, with large cohorts, studies are needed to study the influence of systemic inflammatory markers in prediction of outcomes in NMIBC for a definitive conclusion.

Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score as a Predictor of Recurrence in Patients with High Grade Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Undergoing Intravesical Bacillus Calmette–Guerin Immunotherapy

Russo G. I.;
2022

Abstract

Background: A systemic inflammatory marker, the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS), could predict outcomes in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NIMBC). We aimed to investigate the predictive power of mGPS in oncological outcomes in HG/G3 T1 NMIBC patients undergoing Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) therapy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patient’s medical data from multicenter institutions. A total of 1382 patients with HG/G3 T1 NMIBC have been administered adjuvant intravesical BCG therapy, every week for 3 weeks given at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months. The analysis of mGPS for recurrence and progression was performed using multivariable and univariable Cox regression models. Results: During follow-up, 659 patients (47.68%) suffered recurrence, 441 (31.91%) suffered progression, 156 (11.28%) died of all causes, and 67 (4.84%) died of bladder cancer. At multivariable analysis, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio [hazard ratio (HR): 7.471; p = 0.0001] and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (HR: 0.706; p = 0.006 were significantly associated with recurrence. mGPS has no statistical significance for progression (p = 0.076). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in survival among patients from different mGPS subgroups. Five-year OS was 93% (CI 95% 92–94), in patients with mGPS 0, 82.2% (CI 95% 78.9–85.5) in patients with mGPS 1 and 78.1% (CI 95% 60.4–70) in mGPS 2 patients. Five-year CSS was 98% (CI 95% 97–99) in patients with mGPS 0, 90% (CI 95% 87–94) in patients with mGPS 1, and 100% in mGPS 2 patients. Limitations are applicable to a retrospective study. Conclusions: mGPS may have the potential to predict recurrence in HG/G3 T1 NMIBC patients, but more prospective, with large cohorts, studies are needed to study the influence of systemic inflammatory markers in prediction of outcomes in NMIBC for a definitive conclusion.
Bacillus Calmette–Guérin
Modified Glasgow prognostic score
Non muscle invasive bladder cancer
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/541358
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