Modern computational techniques have greatly influenced the numerical analyses of structures, not only in terms of calculation speed, but also in terms of procedural approach. In particular, great importance has been given to structural modelling, that is, the process by which a structure and the actions to which it is subjected are reduced to a simplified scheme. The use of a simplified calculation scheme is necessary since the structures are, in general, considerably complex physical systems whose behaviour is influenced by a large number of variables. The definition of a structural scheme that is at the same time simple enough to be easily computable as well as sufficiently reliable in reproducing the main characteristics of the behaviour of the analysed structure is, therefore, a crucial task. In particular, with reference to multi-storey framed buildings, the extensive use of three-dimensional finite element models (FEM) has been made in recent decades by researchers and structural engineers. However, an interesting and alternative research field concerns the possibility of studying multi-storey buildings through the use of equivalent beam-like models in which the number of degrees of freedom and the required computational effort are reduced with respect to more demanding FEM models. Several researchers have proposed single or coupled continuous beams to simulate either the static or dynamic response of multi-storey buildings assuming elastic or inelastic behaviour of the constitutive material. In this paper, a review of several scientific papers proposing elastic or inelastic beam-like models for the structural analyses of framed multi-storey buildings is presented. Considerations about limits and potentialities of these models are also included.

A Review of Simplified Numerical Beam-like Models of Multi-Storey Framed Buildings

Greco, A
;
Caddemi, S;Calio, I;Fiore, I
2022

Abstract

Modern computational techniques have greatly influenced the numerical analyses of structures, not only in terms of calculation speed, but also in terms of procedural approach. In particular, great importance has been given to structural modelling, that is, the process by which a structure and the actions to which it is subjected are reduced to a simplified scheme. The use of a simplified calculation scheme is necessary since the structures are, in general, considerably complex physical systems whose behaviour is influenced by a large number of variables. The definition of a structural scheme that is at the same time simple enough to be easily computable as well as sufficiently reliable in reproducing the main characteristics of the behaviour of the analysed structure is, therefore, a crucial task. In particular, with reference to multi-storey framed buildings, the extensive use of three-dimensional finite element models (FEM) has been made in recent decades by researchers and structural engineers. However, an interesting and alternative research field concerns the possibility of studying multi-storey buildings through the use of equivalent beam-like models in which the number of degrees of freedom and the required computational effort are reduced with respect to more demanding FEM models. Several researchers have proposed single or coupled continuous beams to simulate either the static or dynamic response of multi-storey buildings assuming elastic or inelastic behaviour of the constitutive material. In this paper, a review of several scientific papers proposing elastic or inelastic beam-like models for the structural analyses of framed multi-storey buildings is presented. Considerations about limits and potentialities of these models are also included.
modelling of framed structures
multi-storey buildings
beam-like models
elastic models
inelastic models
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/542222
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