Background: We retrospectively analysed relapsed/refractory MM (RRMM) patients treated with pomalidomide and dexamethasone (PomaD) either in real life, or previously enrolled in an interventional (STRATUS, MM-010) or currently enrolled in an observational study (MM-015) to provide further insights on safety and tolerability and clinical efficacy. Methods: Between July 2013 and July 2018, 76 RRMM patients (including 33 double refractory MM) received pomalidomide 4 mg daily given orally on days 1-21 of each 28-day cycle, and dexamethasone 40 mg weekly (<= 75 years) or 20 mg weekly for patients aged > 75 years. In nine patients a third agent was added to increase the response: Cyclophosphamide (in two fit patients) or clarithromycin (in seven frail patients). Patients received subcutaneous filgrastim as part of the prophylaxis regimen for neutropenia. Results: A median number of six (range 2-21) PomaD cycles were given. The regimen was well tolerated with grade 3-4 haematological and non-haematological adverse events in 39 (51%) and 25 (33%) patients, respectively. In patients who developed serious AE, pomalidomide dose reduction (11%, 14%) or definitive discontinuation (18%, 23%) were applied. All patients have been evaluated for response within the first two cycles. The disease control rate (DCR), i.e., those patients that had a response equal or better than stable disease (>= SD), was high (89%), with 44% overall response rate (ORR) after six cycles. The achieved best responses were complete remission (CR, 5%), very good partial remission (VGPR, 4%), partial remission (PR, 35%), minimal response (MR, 7%), and stable disease (SD, 38%). After a median follow up of 19.6 months, median progression free survival was 9.4 months, and overall survival (OS) was 19.02 months. Univariate analysis showed that double refractory patients, or who received more than three previous lines had shorter PFS. At 18 months, regardless of the depth of response, patients with a disease control of at least six months, defined as maintenance of a best clinical and/or biochemical response to treatment for almost six months, had prolonged PFS (35.3% versus 20.6%, p = 0.0003) and OS (81.2% versus 15.9%, p < 0.0001) Conclusions: Our findings indicate that PomaD is a safe and well-tolerated regimen in real-life, associated with prolonged PFS and OS with acceptable toxicity. Moreover, Pd induced disease control in most intensively pre-treated patients and some of them achieved longer PFS than that obtained with the previous treatment.

Clinical Benefit of Long-Term Disease Control with Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma Patients

Parisi, Marina Silvia;Romano, Alessandra;Martino, Enrica Antonia;Calafiore, Valeria;Giubbolini, Rachele;Markovic, Uros;Leotta, Valerio;Di Giorgio, Mary Ann;Tibullo, Daniele;Di Raimondo, Francesco;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Background: We retrospectively analysed relapsed/refractory MM (RRMM) patients treated with pomalidomide and dexamethasone (PomaD) either in real life, or previously enrolled in an interventional (STRATUS, MM-010) or currently enrolled in an observational study (MM-015) to provide further insights on safety and tolerability and clinical efficacy. Methods: Between July 2013 and July 2018, 76 RRMM patients (including 33 double refractory MM) received pomalidomide 4 mg daily given orally on days 1-21 of each 28-day cycle, and dexamethasone 40 mg weekly (<= 75 years) or 20 mg weekly for patients aged > 75 years. In nine patients a third agent was added to increase the response: Cyclophosphamide (in two fit patients) or clarithromycin (in seven frail patients). Patients received subcutaneous filgrastim as part of the prophylaxis regimen for neutropenia. Results: A median number of six (range 2-21) PomaD cycles were given. The regimen was well tolerated with grade 3-4 haematological and non-haematological adverse events in 39 (51%) and 25 (33%) patients, respectively. In patients who developed serious AE, pomalidomide dose reduction (11%, 14%) or definitive discontinuation (18%, 23%) were applied. All patients have been evaluated for response within the first two cycles. The disease control rate (DCR), i.e., those patients that had a response equal or better than stable disease (>= SD), was high (89%), with 44% overall response rate (ORR) after six cycles. The achieved best responses were complete remission (CR, 5%), very good partial remission (VGPR, 4%), partial remission (PR, 35%), minimal response (MR, 7%), and stable disease (SD, 38%). After a median follow up of 19.6 months, median progression free survival was 9.4 months, and overall survival (OS) was 19.02 months. Univariate analysis showed that double refractory patients, or who received more than three previous lines had shorter PFS. At 18 months, regardless of the depth of response, patients with a disease control of at least six months, defined as maintenance of a best clinical and/or biochemical response to treatment for almost six months, had prolonged PFS (35.3% versus 20.6%, p = 0.0003) and OS (81.2% versus 15.9%, p < 0.0001) Conclusions: Our findings indicate that PomaD is a safe and well-tolerated regimen in real-life, associated with prolonged PFS and OS with acceptable toxicity. Moreover, Pd induced disease control in most intensively pre-treated patients and some of them achieved longer PFS than that obtained with the previous treatment.
double refractory
multiple myeloma
pomalidomide
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/542302
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 4
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact