Objectives: To investigate mandibular morphology in adults affected by posterior unilateral crossbite (PUXB) and to evaluate the hemi mandibular volumes from the crossbite (CB) and non-CB sides of the same patients. Methods: Thirty-eight cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were consecutively recruited and the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-formatted scans were volume rendered into a surface three-dimensional (3D) mesh model and volumes to obtain the 3D model of the mandibular bone. To achieve the surface point-to-point analysis of the mandibular models, a reverse engineering software was used. The same procedure was performed for an age-matched control group (19 CBCT images). Results: Total mandibular volume showed a difference of 2.46 cm3 between patients and controls, which was not statistically significant. A mean difference of 1.53 cm3 was found comparing the hemi mandibular volumes from the CB and non-CB sides of PUXB patients, this difference was statistically significant (P ≤ 0.01). Findings for the surface-to-surface deviation analysis, demonstrated a higher percentage of mismatch in patients PUXB, over 10% at 0.5 mm tolerance level. Limitations: Limitations are related to the intrinsic surfaces matching methodology, that make difficult to evaluate discrepancies among different mandibular anatomical units. Conclusion: Adult patients affected by PUXB show a greater mandibular structural asymmetry compared to controls because of a lower matching percentage obtained from the surface-to-surface matching technique. Implications: Treatment of adult patients affected by PUXB should take into consideration the possibility of a mild mandibular asymmetry mainly localized at the condyle and gonial angle levels.

Evaluation of mandibular symmetry and morphology in adult patients with unilateral posterior crossbite: A CBCT study using a surface-to-surface matching technique

Muraglie S.;Lo Giudice A.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate mandibular morphology in adults affected by posterior unilateral crossbite (PUXB) and to evaluate the hemi mandibular volumes from the crossbite (CB) and non-CB sides of the same patients. Methods: Thirty-eight cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were consecutively recruited and the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-formatted scans were volume rendered into a surface three-dimensional (3D) mesh model and volumes to obtain the 3D model of the mandibular bone. To achieve the surface point-to-point analysis of the mandibular models, a reverse engineering software was used. The same procedure was performed for an age-matched control group (19 CBCT images). Results: Total mandibular volume showed a difference of 2.46 cm3 between patients and controls, which was not statistically significant. A mean difference of 1.53 cm3 was found comparing the hemi mandibular volumes from the CB and non-CB sides of PUXB patients, this difference was statistically significant (P ≤ 0.01). Findings for the surface-to-surface deviation analysis, demonstrated a higher percentage of mismatch in patients PUXB, over 10% at 0.5 mm tolerance level. Limitations: Limitations are related to the intrinsic surfaces matching methodology, that make difficult to evaluate discrepancies among different mandibular anatomical units. Conclusion: Adult patients affected by PUXB show a greater mandibular structural asymmetry compared to controls because of a lower matching percentage obtained from the surface-to-surface matching technique. Implications: Treatment of adult patients affected by PUXB should take into consideration the possibility of a mild mandibular asymmetry mainly localized at the condyle and gonial angle levels.
adult
cone-beam computed tomography
mandible
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/543542
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