Since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic onset, many routine medical activities have been put on hold and this has deeply affected the management of patients with chronic diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea. Untreated OSA is associated with increased mortality and difficulties in social functioning. A delay in initiating treatment may therefore have harmful consequences. Between February and April 2020, the so-called first wave of the pandemic, the overall activity of sleep centers in Europe was reduced by 80%. As the international infection control authorities released guidelines for SARS-CoV-2 outbreak control, many of the national sleep societies provided strategies for a gradual re-opening of sleep facilities. Most of these strategies were not evidences-based and, in a climate of general concern, worldwide it was strongly advised to post-pone any non-urgent sleep-related procedure. Despite the initial idea that the outbreak could be transient, after one year it is still ongoing and the price we are paying, not only includes deaths caused by COVID-19, but also deaths caused by missed or late diagnosis. As further delays in diagnosing and treating patients with sleep apnea are no more acceptable, a new arrangement of sleep facilities and resources, in order to operate safely and effectively, is now mandatory. In this article, we review most recent literature and guidelines in order to provide practical advice for a new arrangement of sleep laboratories and the care of patients with obstructive sleep apnea after one year from the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. (C) 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Continuum of care for patients with obstructive sleep apnea after one year from the COVID-19 pandemic onset: no time for further delays: practical issues for a safe and effective management

Spicuzza, Lucia;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic onset, many routine medical activities have been put on hold and this has deeply affected the management of patients with chronic diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea. Untreated OSA is associated with increased mortality and difficulties in social functioning. A delay in initiating treatment may therefore have harmful consequences. Between February and April 2020, the so-called first wave of the pandemic, the overall activity of sleep centers in Europe was reduced by 80%. As the international infection control authorities released guidelines for SARS-CoV-2 outbreak control, many of the national sleep societies provided strategies for a gradual re-opening of sleep facilities. Most of these strategies were not evidences-based and, in a climate of general concern, worldwide it was strongly advised to post-pone any non-urgent sleep-related procedure. Despite the initial idea that the outbreak could be transient, after one year it is still ongoing and the price we are paying, not only includes deaths caused by COVID-19, but also deaths caused by missed or late diagnosis. As further delays in diagnosing and treating patients with sleep apnea are no more acceptable, a new arrangement of sleep facilities and resources, in order to operate safely and effectively, is now mandatory. In this article, we review most recent literature and guidelines in order to provide practical advice for a new arrangement of sleep laboratories and the care of patients with obstructive sleep apnea after one year from the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. (C) 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
COVID-19
CPAP
Obstructive sleep apnea
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/546058
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