The use of beneficial microorganisms, such as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and mycorrhizal fungi (PGPF), for organic farming could improve the productivity and the resilience of vegetable crops. We are studying this topic for organic agriculture in the framework of the EU 2020 BRESOV project “Breeding for Resilient, Efficient and Sustainable Organic Vegetable Production”. Both PGPR and PGPF are allowed for organic farming and they represent new important tools for regenerating poor and marginal soils in transition to the environmentally friendly farming. Additional beneficial effects could be also provided by organic nitrogen compounds of natural origin, such as amino acids and betaines. We evaluated the effects of mycorrhizae and betaines on snap bean crop in relation to the water deficit. The experimental design adopted was split-plot, with the main plot represented by the irrigation level (reintegration of the 100 and 60% of the ETc), the sub-plot by the microbial consortia, the sub-subplot by the betaine and finally the sub-sub-subplot by genotype (‘Domino’ and ‘Maxi’). The seeds were sown in March 2021 in an organic cold greenhouse and the growing cycle finished after 80 days from sowing. We registered the number and the weight of the pods harvested, and the plant characteristics at the end of the growing cycle. The results show a significant increment of the yield by the use of both mycorrhizae and betaines compared to the control. The deficit irrigation applied (ETc 60%) affected differently the genotypes evaluated and the related production, showing a positive effect of both microbial consortia and betaines on yield and produce quality.

Effects of microbial consortia and betaines on snapbean grown under water stress conditions

Arena, D.;Rizzo, G. F.
;
Branca, F.
Ultimo
2022-01-01

Abstract

The use of beneficial microorganisms, such as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and mycorrhizal fungi (PGPF), for organic farming could improve the productivity and the resilience of vegetable crops. We are studying this topic for organic agriculture in the framework of the EU 2020 BRESOV project “Breeding for Resilient, Efficient and Sustainable Organic Vegetable Production”. Both PGPR and PGPF are allowed for organic farming and they represent new important tools for regenerating poor and marginal soils in transition to the environmentally friendly farming. Additional beneficial effects could be also provided by organic nitrogen compounds of natural origin, such as amino acids and betaines. We evaluated the effects of mycorrhizae and betaines on snap bean crop in relation to the water deficit. The experimental design adopted was split-plot, with the main plot represented by the irrigation level (reintegration of the 100 and 60% of the ETc), the sub-plot by the microbial consortia, the sub-subplot by the betaine and finally the sub-sub-subplot by genotype (‘Domino’ and ‘Maxi’). The seeds were sown in March 2021 in an organic cold greenhouse and the growing cycle finished after 80 days from sowing. We registered the number and the weight of the pods harvested, and the plant characteristics at the end of the growing cycle. The results show a significant increment of the yield by the use of both mycorrhizae and betaines compared to the control. The deficit irrigation applied (ETc 60%) affected differently the genotypes evaluated and the related production, showing a positive effect of both microbial consortia and betaines on yield and produce quality.
2022
PGPR, green bean, deficit irrigation, betaine, mycorrhizae
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Malgioglio et al., 2022_Bean_Water Stress_MO e Betaine (1).pdf

solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: Articolo
Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 305.5 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
305.5 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/548253
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact