Despite the promising properties, the problem of cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) heteroepitaxy on silicon has not yet been resolved and its use in microelectronics is limited by the presence of extensive defects. In this paper, we used microphotoluminescence (mu-PL), molten KOH etching, and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HRSTEM) to investigate the effect of nitrogen doping on the distribution of stacking faults (SFs) and assess how increasing dosages of nitrogen during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth inhibits the development of SFs. An innovative angle-resolved SEM observation approach of molten KOH-etched samples resulted in detailed statistics on the density of the different types of defects as a function of the growth thickness of 3C-SiC free-standing samples with varied levels of nitrogen doping. Moreover, we proceeded to shed light on defects revealed by a diamond-shaped pit. In the past, they were conventionally associated with dislocations (Ds) due to what happens in 4H-SiC, where the formation of pits is always linked with the presence of Ds. In this work, the supposed Ds were observed at high magnification (by HRSTEM), demonstrating that principally they are partial dislocations (PDs) that delimit an SF, whose development and propagation are suppressed by the presence of nitrogen. These results were compared with VESTA simulations, which allowed to simulate the 3C-SiC lattice to design two 3C-lattice domains delimited by different types of SFs. In addition, through previous experimental evidence, a preferential impact of nitrogen on the closure of 6H-like SFs was observed as compared to 4H-like SFs.

Impact of Nitrogen on the Selective Closure of Stacking Faults in 3C-SiC

Calabretta, Cristiano;Cannizzaro, Annalisa;Anzalone, Ruggero;Calcagno, Lucia;Boninelli, Simona;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Despite the promising properties, the problem of cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) heteroepitaxy on silicon has not yet been resolved and its use in microelectronics is limited by the presence of extensive defects. In this paper, we used microphotoluminescence (mu-PL), molten KOH etching, and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HRSTEM) to investigate the effect of nitrogen doping on the distribution of stacking faults (SFs) and assess how increasing dosages of nitrogen during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth inhibits the development of SFs. An innovative angle-resolved SEM observation approach of molten KOH-etched samples resulted in detailed statistics on the density of the different types of defects as a function of the growth thickness of 3C-SiC free-standing samples with varied levels of nitrogen doping. Moreover, we proceeded to shed light on defects revealed by a diamond-shaped pit. In the past, they were conventionally associated with dislocations (Ds) due to what happens in 4H-SiC, where the formation of pits is always linked with the presence of Ds. In this work, the supposed Ds were observed at high magnification (by HRSTEM), demonstrating that principally they are partial dislocations (PDs) that delimit an SF, whose development and propagation are suppressed by the presence of nitrogen. These results were compared with VESTA simulations, which allowed to simulate the 3C-SiC lattice to design two 3C-lattice domains delimited by different types of SFs. In addition, through previous experimental evidence, a preferential impact of nitrogen on the closure of 6H-like SFs was observed as compared to 4H-like SFs.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Nitrogen.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 2.16 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.16 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/551185
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact