Background: Long-duration response (LDR) to levodopa and motor learning could be involved in changes in neuroplasticity of cortical excitability in Parkinson's disease (PD). P300, motor evoked potentials (MEPs), and Bereitschaftspotential (BP) are neurophysiological surrogate markers of neuroplasticity. Objective: We aimed to define in PD the effects of LDR and motor learning on neurophysiological parameters involved in neuroplasticity. Methods: Drug-naive PD patients underwent a 15-day treatment with levodopa/carbidopa 250/25 mg daily. Achievement of LDR was assessed on the 15th day of treatment (T15). Patients were grouped based on the achievement of a sustained LDR (LDR+) or no LDR (LDR-) and to the assignment of a learning motor exercise (LME) or no motor exercise (NME). Patients underwent clinical and neurophysiological (P300, MEPs, and BP) assessments at baseline (T0) and on T15. Results: Forty-one PD patients and 24 age- and sex-matched normal controls (NCs) were enrolled. Neurophysiological parameters differed between untreated PD patients and NCs. Four groups of patients were obtained at the end of treatments: trained patients with a sustained LDR (LDR + LME group), untrained patients with a sustained LDR (LDR + NME group), trained patients without LDR (LDR-LME group), and untrained patients without LDR (LDR-NME group). At baseline, no differences in clinical and neurophysiological parameters were evident among the groups. After the treatments, significant improvements in neurophysiological parameters were observed in the LDR + LME group. No modifications were found in the groups without LDR. Conclusions: The achievement of a sustained LDR may act synergistically with motor learning to induce adaptive changes in neuroplasticity in basal ganglia and cortical networks. Our findings support LDR as a pharmacological outcome possibly facilitating the action of motor learning on neuroplasticity in early PD. © 2023 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Long-Duration Response to Levodopa, Motor Learning, and Neuroplasticity in Early Parkinson's Disease

Mostile, Giovanni;Donzuso, Giulia;Nicoletti, Alessandra;Zappia, Mario
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Long-duration response (LDR) to levodopa and motor learning could be involved in changes in neuroplasticity of cortical excitability in Parkinson's disease (PD). P300, motor evoked potentials (MEPs), and Bereitschaftspotential (BP) are neurophysiological surrogate markers of neuroplasticity. Objective: We aimed to define in PD the effects of LDR and motor learning on neurophysiological parameters involved in neuroplasticity. Methods: Drug-naive PD patients underwent a 15-day treatment with levodopa/carbidopa 250/25 mg daily. Achievement of LDR was assessed on the 15th day of treatment (T15). Patients were grouped based on the achievement of a sustained LDR (LDR+) or no LDR (LDR-) and to the assignment of a learning motor exercise (LME) or no motor exercise (NME). Patients underwent clinical and neurophysiological (P300, MEPs, and BP) assessments at baseline (T0) and on T15. Results: Forty-one PD patients and 24 age- and sex-matched normal controls (NCs) were enrolled. Neurophysiological parameters differed between untreated PD patients and NCs. Four groups of patients were obtained at the end of treatments: trained patients with a sustained LDR (LDR + LME group), untrained patients with a sustained LDR (LDR + NME group), trained patients without LDR (LDR-LME group), and untrained patients without LDR (LDR-NME group). At baseline, no differences in clinical and neurophysiological parameters were evident among the groups. After the treatments, significant improvements in neurophysiological parameters were observed in the LDR + LME group. No modifications were found in the groups without LDR. Conclusions: The achievement of a sustained LDR may act synergistically with motor learning to induce adaptive changes in neuroplasticity in basal ganglia and cortical networks. Our findings support LDR as a pharmacological outcome possibly facilitating the action of motor learning on neuroplasticity in early PD. © 2023 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
2023
Parkinson's disease
levodopa
long-duration response
motor learning
treatment
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/551642
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