Loss of noradrenaline (NA)-rich afferents from the Locus Coeruleus (LC) ascending to the hippocampal formation has been reported to dramatically affect distinct aspects of cognitive function, in addition to reducing the proliferation of neural progenitors in the dentate gyrus. Here, the hypothesis that reinstating hippocampal noradrenergic neurotransmission with transplanted LC-derived neuroblasts would concurrently normalize both cognitive performance and adult hippocampal neurogenesis was investigated. Post-natal day (PD) 4 rats underwent selective immunolesioning of hippocampal noradrenergic afferents followed, 4 days later, by the bilateral intrahippocampal implantation of LC noradrenergic-rich or control cerebellar (CBL) neuroblasts. Starting from 4 weeks and up to about 9 months post-surgery, sensory-motor and spatial navigation abilities were evaluated, followed by post-mortem semiquantitative tissue analyses. All animals in the Control, Lesion, Noradrenergic Transplant and Control CBL Transplant groups exhibited normal sensory-motor function and were equally efficient in the reference memory version of the water maze task. By contrast, working memory abilities were seen to be consistently impaired in the Lesion-only and Control CBL-Transplanted rats, which also exhibited a virtually complete noradrenergic fiber depletion and a significant 62-65% reduction in proliferating 5-bromo-2 ' deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive progenitors in the dentate gyrus. Notably, the noradrenergic reinnervation promoted by the grafted LC, but not cerebellar neuroblasts, significantly ameliorated working memory performance and reinstated a fairly normal density of proliferating progenitors. Thus, LC-derived noradrenergic inputs may act as positive regulators of hippocampus-dependent spatial working memory possibly via the concurrent maintenance of normal progenitor proliferation in the dentate gyrus

Hippocampal Noradrenaline Is a Positive Regulator of Spatial Working Memory and Neurogenesis in the Rat

Rosario Gulino
Co-primo
;
Giampiero Leanza
Ultimo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Loss of noradrenaline (NA)-rich afferents from the Locus Coeruleus (LC) ascending to the hippocampal formation has been reported to dramatically affect distinct aspects of cognitive function, in addition to reducing the proliferation of neural progenitors in the dentate gyrus. Here, the hypothesis that reinstating hippocampal noradrenergic neurotransmission with transplanted LC-derived neuroblasts would concurrently normalize both cognitive performance and adult hippocampal neurogenesis was investigated. Post-natal day (PD) 4 rats underwent selective immunolesioning of hippocampal noradrenergic afferents followed, 4 days later, by the bilateral intrahippocampal implantation of LC noradrenergic-rich or control cerebellar (CBL) neuroblasts. Starting from 4 weeks and up to about 9 months post-surgery, sensory-motor and spatial navigation abilities were evaluated, followed by post-mortem semiquantitative tissue analyses. All animals in the Control, Lesion, Noradrenergic Transplant and Control CBL Transplant groups exhibited normal sensory-motor function and were equally efficient in the reference memory version of the water maze task. By contrast, working memory abilities were seen to be consistently impaired in the Lesion-only and Control CBL-Transplanted rats, which also exhibited a virtually complete noradrenergic fiber depletion and a significant 62-65% reduction in proliferating 5-bromo-2 ' deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive progenitors in the dentate gyrus. Notably, the noradrenergic reinnervation promoted by the grafted LC, but not cerebellar neuroblasts, significantly ameliorated working memory performance and reinstated a fairly normal density of proliferating progenitors. Thus, LC-derived noradrenergic inputs may act as positive regulators of hippocampus-dependent spatial working memory possibly via the concurrent maintenance of normal progenitor proliferation in the dentate gyrus
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/553222
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