Music plays an important role in brain physiology, in some areas related to emotions, food intake and body weight, such as the hypothalamus. There are different frequencies to which it can be tuned, today the most utilized is at 440 Hz, while in the past the 432 Hz frequency was more used to show particular effects on brain. It is known that Ghrelin, a peptide hormone, regulates food intake in the hypothalamus; in a previous paper, we reported that musical stimuli at 432 Hz modified the Ghrelin expression in the rat, increasing beneficial effects on metabolism. In this study, we used this frequency and we focused our attention on body weight, Ghrelin expression, and neuron morphology in hypothalamic cultures. To investigate the role of music, we utilized newborn pups from pregnant rats that were exposed to music stimuli at 432 Hz during the perinatal period and for the postnatal period, some for 3 days (P3) and others for 6 days (P6). Some pups were not exposed to music stimuli (controls). Our results showed that music increased the body weight of pups; in addition, enhanced Ghrelin expression in hypothalamic neurons and their axonal elongation were highlighted by immunocytochemical techniques. Moreover, we found that the positive music effect started in pups at P3 and increased at P6 compared with controls. These results suggest that the musical frequency at 432 Hz could stimulate the orexigenic Ghrelin effects influencing the increase in body weight and affecting the number of hypothalamic neurons expressing Ghrelin.

Prenatal music exposure influences weight, ghrelin expression, and morphology of rat hypothalamic neuron cultures

Russo, Cristina;Pellitteri, Rosalia;Stanzani, Stefania;Russo, Antonella
2021-01-01

Abstract

Music plays an important role in brain physiology, in some areas related to emotions, food intake and body weight, such as the hypothalamus. There are different frequencies to which it can be tuned, today the most utilized is at 440 Hz, while in the past the 432 Hz frequency was more used to show particular effects on brain. It is known that Ghrelin, a peptide hormone, regulates food intake in the hypothalamus; in a previous paper, we reported that musical stimuli at 432 Hz modified the Ghrelin expression in the rat, increasing beneficial effects on metabolism. In this study, we used this frequency and we focused our attention on body weight, Ghrelin expression, and neuron morphology in hypothalamic cultures. To investigate the role of music, we utilized newborn pups from pregnant rats that were exposed to music stimuli at 432 Hz during the perinatal period and for the postnatal period, some for 3 days (P3) and others for 6 days (P6). Some pups were not exposed to music stimuli (controls). Our results showed that music increased the body weight of pups; in addition, enhanced Ghrelin expression in hypothalamic neurons and their axonal elongation were highlighted by immunocytochemical techniques. Moreover, we found that the positive music effect started in pups at P3 and increased at P6 compared with controls. These results suggest that the musical frequency at 432 Hz could stimulate the orexigenic Ghrelin effects influencing the increase in body weight and affecting the number of hypothalamic neurons expressing Ghrelin.
2021
Ghrelin
body weight
hypothalamic cultures
musical frequencies
neuron morphology
Animals
Body Weight
Cell Shape
Female
Ghrelin
Hypothalamus
Music
Neurons
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Prenatal music exposure influences weight.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 530.92 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
530.92 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/555262
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact