The hydrodynamics of turbulent oscillatory flow over a gravel-based irregular rough wall is investigated using laser-Doppler anemometry measurements of velocities in a large oscillatory flow tunnel and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. The same periodic irregular roughness was used for both experiments and DNS. Four flow shapes are investigated: sinusoidal, skewed, asymmetric and combined skewed-asymmetric. The experiments were conducted for target Reynolds numbers (based on the Stokes length and standard deviation of free-stream velocity) of R-delta,R-sigma = 800 and R-delta,R-sigma = 1549; DNS was conducted for flows with target R-delta,R-sigma = 800. Boundary layer thickness, bottom phase lead and friction factor are in good agreement with previous studies. For the first time, evidence of Prandtl's secondary flows of the second kind in oscillatory flow is presented. Turbulence structure is visualised using isosurfaces of lambda(2) (Jeong & Hussain J. Fluid Mech., vol. 285, 1995, pp. 69-94), revealing densely packed structures that grow stronger and weaker in correspondence with the free-stream velocity. Reynolds and dispersive stresses peak just below the highest roughness crest, with dispersive stress vanishing a short distance above the roughness. Bursts of turbulence kinetic energy and wake kinetic energy are generated each flow half-cycle, with variable behaviour depending on flow shape. Non-Gaussian turbulence statistics are observed that originate near the wall, becoming increasingly non-Gaussian far from the wall. Probability density functions of turbulence statistics can be closely approximated by a fourth-order Gram-Charlier distribution at most phases and elevations, though when statistics deviate more strongly from Gaussian, streamwise and wall-normal (spanwise) statistics are better described by a Pearson type IV (VII) distribution.

An experimental and numerical study of turbulent oscillatory flow over an irregular rough wall

Pietro Scandura;
2023-01-01

Abstract

The hydrodynamics of turbulent oscillatory flow over a gravel-based irregular rough wall is investigated using laser-Doppler anemometry measurements of velocities in a large oscillatory flow tunnel and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. The same periodic irregular roughness was used for both experiments and DNS. Four flow shapes are investigated: sinusoidal, skewed, asymmetric and combined skewed-asymmetric. The experiments were conducted for target Reynolds numbers (based on the Stokes length and standard deviation of free-stream velocity) of R-delta,R-sigma = 800 and R-delta,R-sigma = 1549; DNS was conducted for flows with target R-delta,R-sigma = 800. Boundary layer thickness, bottom phase lead and friction factor are in good agreement with previous studies. For the first time, evidence of Prandtl's secondary flows of the second kind in oscillatory flow is presented. Turbulence structure is visualised using isosurfaces of lambda(2) (Jeong & Hussain J. Fluid Mech., vol. 285, 1995, pp. 69-94), revealing densely packed structures that grow stronger and weaker in correspondence with the free-stream velocity. Reynolds and dispersive stresses peak just below the highest roughness crest, with dispersive stress vanishing a short distance above the roughness. Bursts of turbulence kinetic energy and wake kinetic energy are generated each flow half-cycle, with variable behaviour depending on flow shape. Non-Gaussian turbulence statistics are observed that originate near the wall, becoming increasingly non-Gaussian far from the wall. Probability density functions of turbulence statistics can be closely approximated by a fourth-order Gram-Charlier distribution at most phases and elevations, though when statistics deviate more strongly from Gaussian, streamwise and wall-normal (spanwise) statistics are better described by a Pearson type IV (VII) distribution.
2023
turbulent boundary layers
surface gravity waves
coastal engineering
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/559602
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