Background-In patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, the prognostic value of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and the influence of sex remain poorly defined.Methods and Results-Consecutive patients with stable coronary artery disease who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention were included. Primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. Unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) in overall and sex-specific population and multivariable adjusted HR were calculated by using Cox proportional hazard models. In a total of 5626 patients, elevated hs-cTnT levels, more than the sex-specific 99th percentile upper reference limit of normal (URL), were observed in 2221 patients (39%) at baseline. During follow-up (median, 14.5 months; 25th-75th percentiles, 6.4-27.2 months), 265 patients died. Mortality was higher in patients with the sex-specific 99th percentile URL compared to those with normal hs-cTnT (17.3% vs 3.4%; HR=6.10; 95% CI, 4.58-8.14; P<0.001). hs-cTnT was an independent predictor of mortality in multivariable adjusted models. The C-statistic was significantly increased by adding hs-cTnT to the basic prediction model for mortality (0.793-0.815; P<0.001). There was a significant interaction between hs-cTnT and sex on mortality. Differences in all-cause mortality between patients with more than the sex-specific 99th percentile URL and those with normal hs-cTnT were numerically larger in male than female patients (male, HR=6.45; 95% CI, 4.68-8.87, P<0.001; female, HR=4.29, 95% CI, 2.36-9.03; P<0.001).Conclusions-In patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, preprocedural hs-cTnT was a strong predictor of mortality in both men and women.

Prognostic Value of Cardiac Troponin T and Sex in Patients Undergoing Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

Giacoppo, Daniele;
2016-01-01

Abstract

Background-In patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, the prognostic value of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and the influence of sex remain poorly defined.Methods and Results-Consecutive patients with stable coronary artery disease who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention were included. Primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. Unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) in overall and sex-specific population and multivariable adjusted HR were calculated by using Cox proportional hazard models. In a total of 5626 patients, elevated hs-cTnT levels, more than the sex-specific 99th percentile upper reference limit of normal (URL), were observed in 2221 patients (39%) at baseline. During follow-up (median, 14.5 months; 25th-75th percentiles, 6.4-27.2 months), 265 patients died. Mortality was higher in patients with the sex-specific 99th percentile URL compared to those with normal hs-cTnT (17.3% vs 3.4%; HR=6.10; 95% CI, 4.58-8.14; P<0.001). hs-cTnT was an independent predictor of mortality in multivariable adjusted models. The C-statistic was significantly increased by adding hs-cTnT to the basic prediction model for mortality (0.793-0.815; P<0.001). There was a significant interaction between hs-cTnT and sex on mortality. Differences in all-cause mortality between patients with more than the sex-specific 99th percentile URL and those with normal hs-cTnT were numerically larger in male than female patients (male, HR=6.45; 95% CI, 4.68-8.87, P<0.001; female, HR=4.29, 95% CI, 2.36-9.03; P<0.001).Conclusions-In patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, preprocedural hs-cTnT was a strong predictor of mortality in both men and women.
2016
percutaneous coronary intervention
sex
stable coronary artery disease
troponin T
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/590176
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