The force steadiness capabilities of the hip abductors and ankle dorsiflexors can explain a significant amount of the variance in postural sway during four types of standing balance tests. Control over balance, as well as force steadiness, generally worsens with aging, although the latter can be improved with unique training interventions. The purpose of our study was to assess how tempo-controlled, light-load resistance training of the hip abductors and ankle dorsiflexors influences performance in clinical movement tests, postural sway, muscle strength, and force steadiness in older adults. Participants (n = 28, 70 +/- 7 years, 8 men) completed nine training sessions for either the hip abductors or ankle dorsiflexors in the nondominant leg. Training involved lifting a load equal to 15% of the maximal force achieved during an isometric contraction. Linear mixed-effects models revealed no changes (p > 0.05) in Sit-To-Stand test, Timed Up-and-Go test, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, or postural sway from before to after either training intervention. Only the dorsiflexor group significantly improved nondominant leg dorsiflexion force steadiness, but this did not translate to any other tasks. However, absolute and relative measures of MVC torque and force steadiness of the hip abductors and ankle dorsiflexors in the dominant and nondominant legs could predict sway-area rate in each of the four standing balance conditions. The responsiveness of leg muscles to light-load steadiness training in older adults appears to depend on the type of exercises performed during the intervention.

Tempo-controlled resistance training of the hip abductors and ankle dorsiflexors with light loads does not improve postural sway in older adults

Amato, Alessandra;
2022-01-01

Abstract

The force steadiness capabilities of the hip abductors and ankle dorsiflexors can explain a significant amount of the variance in postural sway during four types of standing balance tests. Control over balance, as well as force steadiness, generally worsens with aging, although the latter can be improved with unique training interventions. The purpose of our study was to assess how tempo-controlled, light-load resistance training of the hip abductors and ankle dorsiflexors influences performance in clinical movement tests, postural sway, muscle strength, and force steadiness in older adults. Participants (n = 28, 70 +/- 7 years, 8 men) completed nine training sessions for either the hip abductors or ankle dorsiflexors in the nondominant leg. Training involved lifting a load equal to 15% of the maximal force achieved during an isometric contraction. Linear mixed-effects models revealed no changes (p > 0.05) in Sit-To-Stand test, Timed Up-and-Go test, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, or postural sway from before to after either training intervention. Only the dorsiflexor group significantly improved nondominant leg dorsiflexion force steadiness, but this did not translate to any other tasks. However, absolute and relative measures of MVC torque and force steadiness of the hip abductors and ankle dorsiflexors in the dominant and nondominant legs could predict sway-area rate in each of the four standing balance conditions. The responsiveness of leg muscles to light-load steadiness training in older adults appears to depend on the type of exercises performed during the intervention.
2022
Ankle dorsiflexion
Balance
Force steadiness
Hip abduction
Resistance training
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/590970
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