Purpose: Literature regarding total hip arthroplasty for pediatric hip diseases is scarce. This review aims to portray the various orthopedic conditions of childhood that can lead to significant impairment of the hip joint and, ultimately, to total hip arthroplasty in adolescence and adulthood. Methods: In total, 61 out of 3666 articles were selected according to (1) the diagnosis of one of the 12 pediatric hip pathologies (Legg-Perthes-Calvé disease, developmental dysplasia of the hip, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, neuromuscular hip dysplasia, post-traumatic avascular necrosis of the proximal femur, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, achondroplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, mucopolysaccharidosis, mucolipidosis, hip infections, and tumors) that required total hip arthroplasty; (2) minimum follow-up of 16 months; (3) assessed outcome with a clinical or radiologic score; (4) Methodological Items for Non-Randomized Studies quality score of 9 or higher. The following information for each pathology was retrieved: mean age at total hip arthroplasty, reason for total hip arthroplasty, type of total hip arthroplasty, surgical technique, mean follow-up, and outcomes. Results: Overall, the mean age at total hip arthroplasty for pediatric hip disease is in the sixth and seventh decade, except for tumors and skeletal dysplasias. The reason for performing total hip arthroplasty is often osteoarthrosis and abnormal anatomy. Prosthesis types change based on patient's conditions and technological advances; custom-made implants are used for tumors, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and skeletal dysplasias; for other diseases, the most frequent are modular cementless implants. Outcomes are generally good, and all studies portray functional and pain improvements. Conclusion: Total hip arthroplasty is performed more frequently than in the past in patients with pediatric hip pathologies; it enhances patients' quality of life by reducing pain and improving function. However, revision rate in these patients is not negligible.

Total hip arthroplasty in patients with common pediatric hip orthopedic pathology

De Salvo, Sara;Lucenti, Ludovico;Sapienza, Marco;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: Literature regarding total hip arthroplasty for pediatric hip diseases is scarce. This review aims to portray the various orthopedic conditions of childhood that can lead to significant impairment of the hip joint and, ultimately, to total hip arthroplasty in adolescence and adulthood. Methods: In total, 61 out of 3666 articles were selected according to (1) the diagnosis of one of the 12 pediatric hip pathologies (Legg-Perthes-Calvé disease, developmental dysplasia of the hip, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, neuromuscular hip dysplasia, post-traumatic avascular necrosis of the proximal femur, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, achondroplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, mucopolysaccharidosis, mucolipidosis, hip infections, and tumors) that required total hip arthroplasty; (2) minimum follow-up of 16 months; (3) assessed outcome with a clinical or radiologic score; (4) Methodological Items for Non-Randomized Studies quality score of 9 or higher. The following information for each pathology was retrieved: mean age at total hip arthroplasty, reason for total hip arthroplasty, type of total hip arthroplasty, surgical technique, mean follow-up, and outcomes. Results: Overall, the mean age at total hip arthroplasty for pediatric hip disease is in the sixth and seventh decade, except for tumors and skeletal dysplasias. The reason for performing total hip arthroplasty is often osteoarthrosis and abnormal anatomy. Prosthesis types change based on patient's conditions and technological advances; custom-made implants are used for tumors, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and skeletal dysplasias; for other diseases, the most frequent are modular cementless implants. Outcomes are generally good, and all studies portray functional and pain improvements. Conclusion: Total hip arthroplasty is performed more frequently than in the past in patients with pediatric hip pathologies; it enhances patients' quality of life by reducing pain and improving function. However, revision rate in these patients is not negligible.
2024
Total hip arthroplasty
children
hip pathology
outcome
pediatric
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/609230
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