Introduction: Corticosteroid injections have demonstrated short-term benefits for shoulder pain. This symptomatic treatment method is used in various inflammatory conditions that affect the shoulder joint. Corticosteroid joint injections are not without risks and complications. Adverse effects have been documented, including damage to the articular cartilage, tendon rupture, and attenuation of the subject's immune response. The aim of this study was to examine the timing of preoperative corticosteroid injections on infectious outcomes of shoulder arthroscopies and shoulder arthroplasty. Materials and methods: In accordance with the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), the PubMed, Cochrane, and Science Direct databases were systematically reviewed by two independent authors in January 2024. After full-text reading and checking the reference lists, 11 article were included. Results: Patients who received a shoulder injection within three months prior to undergoing shoulder arthroplasty exhibited a markedly elevated incidence of infection. In addition, a significantly increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) at 90 days postoperatively in patients who received CSIs (corticosteroid injections) within 1 month prior to shoulder arthroplasty was found. Different authors consider CSI injections within the 2 weeks prior to shoulder arthroscopy surgery principally associated with an increased risk of postoperative infection. Discussion: There is still no consensus on the correct timing of preoperative CSIs in both arthroscopic and arthroplasty procedures. The literature does not identify whether the number of preoperative injections could increase the risk of periprosthetic infection. Obesity, sex, and smoking did not have a significant effect on PJIs; alcohol abuse could be considered as a risk factor for PJIs with CSIs. Both in prosthetic surgeries and in arthroscopy procedures, modifiable and unmodifiable factors play secondary roles. The risk of postoperative infection is greater within 3 months, although it is almost comparable at one- and two-year follow-ups.

Do Preoperative Corticosteroid Injections Increase the Risk of Infection after Shoulder Arthroscopy or Shoulder Arthroplasty? A Systematic Review

Lucenti, Ludovico;Panvini, Flora Maria Chiara;de Cristo, Claudia;Rapisarda, Damiano;Sapienza, Marco;Testa, Gianluca;Pavone, Vito
2024-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Corticosteroid injections have demonstrated short-term benefits for shoulder pain. This symptomatic treatment method is used in various inflammatory conditions that affect the shoulder joint. Corticosteroid joint injections are not without risks and complications. Adverse effects have been documented, including damage to the articular cartilage, tendon rupture, and attenuation of the subject's immune response. The aim of this study was to examine the timing of preoperative corticosteroid injections on infectious outcomes of shoulder arthroscopies and shoulder arthroplasty. Materials and methods: In accordance with the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), the PubMed, Cochrane, and Science Direct databases were systematically reviewed by two independent authors in January 2024. After full-text reading and checking the reference lists, 11 article were included. Results: Patients who received a shoulder injection within three months prior to undergoing shoulder arthroplasty exhibited a markedly elevated incidence of infection. In addition, a significantly increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) at 90 days postoperatively in patients who received CSIs (corticosteroid injections) within 1 month prior to shoulder arthroplasty was found. Different authors consider CSI injections within the 2 weeks prior to shoulder arthroscopy surgery principally associated with an increased risk of postoperative infection. Discussion: There is still no consensus on the correct timing of preoperative CSIs in both arthroscopic and arthroplasty procedures. The literature does not identify whether the number of preoperative injections could increase the risk of periprosthetic infection. Obesity, sex, and smoking did not have a significant effect on PJIs; alcohol abuse could be considered as a risk factor for PJIs with CSIs. Both in prosthetic surgeries and in arthroscopy procedures, modifiable and unmodifiable factors play secondary roles. The risk of postoperative infection is greater within 3 months, although it is almost comparable at one- and two-year follow-ups.
2024
PJI
arthroplasty
arthroscopy
periprosthetic infection
preoperative corticosteroid injection
shoulder
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/609237
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