Obesity is considered a risk factor for different types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Bariatric surgery has been associated with improvements in obesity-related co-morbidities and reduc-tions in overall cancer risk. However, given the contradictory outcomes of several cohort studies, the impact of bariatric surgery on CRC risk appears controversial. Furthermore, measurement of CRC biomarkers following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has revealed hyperproliferation and increased pro-inflammatory gene expression in the rectal mucosa. The proposed mechanisms leading to increased CRC risk are alterations of the gut microbiota and exposure of the colorectum to high concentrations of bile acids, both of which are caused by RYGB-induced anatomical rearrangements. Studies in animals and humans have highlighted the similarities between RYGB-induced microbial profiles and the gut microbiota documented in CRC. Microbial alterations common to post-RYGB cases and CRC include the enrichment of pro-inflammatory microbes and reduction in butyrate -producing bacteria. Lower concentrations of butyrate following RYGB may also contribute to an increased risk of CRC, given the anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties of this molecule. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appears to have a more moderate impact than RYGB; however, relatively few animal and human studies have investigated its effects on CRC risk. Moreover, evi-dence regarding the impact of anastomosis gastric bypass on one is even more limited. Therefore, further studies are required to establish whether the potential increase in CRC risk is restricted to RYGB or may also be associated with other bariatric procedures. (Surg Obes Relat Dis 2023;19:144-157.)(c) 2023 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

The impact of bariatric surgery on colorectal cancer risk

D'Amato, Sara;Litrico, Giorgia;La Greca, Gaetano;Latteri, Saverio
2023-01-01

Abstract

Obesity is considered a risk factor for different types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Bariatric surgery has been associated with improvements in obesity-related co-morbidities and reduc-tions in overall cancer risk. However, given the contradictory outcomes of several cohort studies, the impact of bariatric surgery on CRC risk appears controversial. Furthermore, measurement of CRC biomarkers following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has revealed hyperproliferation and increased pro-inflammatory gene expression in the rectal mucosa. The proposed mechanisms leading to increased CRC risk are alterations of the gut microbiota and exposure of the colorectum to high concentrations of bile acids, both of which are caused by RYGB-induced anatomical rearrangements. Studies in animals and humans have highlighted the similarities between RYGB-induced microbial profiles and the gut microbiota documented in CRC. Microbial alterations common to post-RYGB cases and CRC include the enrichment of pro-inflammatory microbes and reduction in butyrate -producing bacteria. Lower concentrations of butyrate following RYGB may also contribute to an increased risk of CRC, given the anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties of this molecule. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appears to have a more moderate impact than RYGB; however, relatively few animal and human studies have investigated its effects on CRC risk. Moreover, evi-dence regarding the impact of anastomosis gastric bypass on one is even more limited. Therefore, further studies are required to establish whether the potential increase in CRC risk is restricted to RYGB or may also be associated with other bariatric procedures. (Surg Obes Relat Dis 2023;19:144-157.)(c) 2023 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
2023
Bariatric surgery
Bile acids
Colorectal cancer risk
Microbiota
Short-chain fatty acids
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/613272
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