Purpose: To developinternationally harmonised standards for programmes of training in intensive care medicine (ICM). Methods: Standards were developedby using consensus techniques. A nine-member nominal group of European intensive care experts developed a preliminary set of standards. These were revised and refined through a modified Delphi process involving 28 European nationalcoordinators representing national training organisations using a combination of moderated discussion meetings, email, and a Web-based tool for determining the level ofagreement with each proposed standard, and whether the standard could be achieved in the respondent’s country. Results: The nominal group developed an initial set of 52possible standards which underwent four iterations to achieve maximal consensus. All national coordinatorsapproved a final set of 29 standards in four domains: training centres, training programmes, selection oftrainees, and trainers’ profiles. Only three standards were consideredimmediately achievable by all countries, demonstrating a willingness to aspire to quality rather than merelysetting a minimum level. Nine proposed standards which did not achieve full consensus were identified as potential candidates for future review. Conclusions: This preliminaryset of clearly defined and agreed standards provides a transparent framework for assuring the quality of training programmes, and afoundation for international harmonisation and quality improvement of training in ICM.

International standards for programmes of training in intensive care medicine in Europe

RUBULOTTA F
2011-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: To developinternationally harmonised standards for programmes of training in intensive care medicine (ICM). Methods: Standards were developedby using consensus techniques. A nine-member nominal group of European intensive care experts developed a preliminary set of standards. These were revised and refined through a modified Delphi process involving 28 European nationalcoordinators representing national training organisations using a combination of moderated discussion meetings, email, and a Web-based tool for determining the level ofagreement with each proposed standard, and whether the standard could be achieved in the respondent’s country. Results: The nominal group developed an initial set of 52possible standards which underwent four iterations to achieve maximal consensus. All national coordinatorsapproved a final set of 29 standards in four domains: training centres, training programmes, selection oftrainees, and trainers’ profiles. Only three standards were consideredimmediately achievable by all countries, demonstrating a willingness to aspire to quality rather than merelysetting a minimum level. Nine proposed standards which did not achieve full consensus were identified as potential candidates for future review. Conclusions: This preliminaryset of clearly defined and agreed standards provides a transparent framework for assuring the quality of training programmes, and afoundation for international harmonisation and quality improvement of training in ICM.
2011
Intensive care
Standards
Quality assurance
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/617332
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