Study Objectives Recently, criteria have been drawn up for large muscle group movements during sleep (LMM), defined as movements lasting for 3-45 seconds in adults, which are often accompanied by changes in sleep stage, arousals, and increases in heart rate. The aim of this study was to characterize LMM in restless legs syndrome (RLS) in order to better evaluate their impact on the neurophysiology of the disorder and, therefore, the possible clinical implications.Methods Consecutive, drug-free patients diagnosed with RLS and controls, aged 18 years or more, were retrospectively enrolled. Leg movement activity-short-interval (SILMS), periodic (PLMS), and isolated (ISOLMS) leg movements during sleep-and LMM were detected and scored.Results In total, 100 patients and 67 controls were recruited. All movement measures were significantly higher in RLS. A significant positive correlation was found between LMM and ISOLMS index but not PLMS index in both groups. LMM index showed a significant negative correlation with total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and percentage of sleep stages N3 and R, as well as a significant positive correlation with the number of awakenings, and percentage of sleep stages N1 and N2 only in patients with RLS. No significant correlation was found between either LMM or PLMS index and RLS severity.Conclusions Different types of movements, including SILMS, ISOLMS, and LMM, play somewhat distinct roles in sleep neurophysiology in RLS. Notably, LMM, a newly recognized category of movements, demonstrates associations with sleep architecture instability and fragmentation, arousals, and awakenings, suggesting potential clinical implications.

Large muscle group movements during sleep in restless leg syndrome: neurophysiological and clinical implications

Giuseppe Lanza;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Study Objectives Recently, criteria have been drawn up for large muscle group movements during sleep (LMM), defined as movements lasting for 3-45 seconds in adults, which are often accompanied by changes in sleep stage, arousals, and increases in heart rate. The aim of this study was to characterize LMM in restless legs syndrome (RLS) in order to better evaluate their impact on the neurophysiology of the disorder and, therefore, the possible clinical implications.Methods Consecutive, drug-free patients diagnosed with RLS and controls, aged 18 years or more, were retrospectively enrolled. Leg movement activity-short-interval (SILMS), periodic (PLMS), and isolated (ISOLMS) leg movements during sleep-and LMM were detected and scored.Results In total, 100 patients and 67 controls were recruited. All movement measures were significantly higher in RLS. A significant positive correlation was found between LMM and ISOLMS index but not PLMS index in both groups. LMM index showed a significant negative correlation with total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and percentage of sleep stages N3 and R, as well as a significant positive correlation with the number of awakenings, and percentage of sleep stages N1 and N2 only in patients with RLS. No significant correlation was found between either LMM or PLMS index and RLS severity.Conclusions Different types of movements, including SILMS, ISOLMS, and LMM, play somewhat distinct roles in sleep neurophysiology in RLS. Notably, LMM, a newly recognized category of movements, demonstrates associations with sleep architecture instability and fragmentation, arousals, and awakenings, suggesting potential clinical implications.
2024
arousals
isolated leg movements during sleep
large muscle group movements during sleep
periodic leg movements during sleep
restless legs syndrome
sleep-related movements
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/620114
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