Traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus are infrequent but difficult to treat, requiring experience with trauma and colo-proctological surgery. The aim of the treatment is to repair the lesions and to minimise the early complications which are the main cause of failure and of late complications and disability. The most complicated lesions present problems concerning either the surgical strategy or the surgical timing, both of which are essential for a successful outcome. The Authors analyse their recent clinical experience with 7 patients with complex traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus, excluding those of gynaecological/obstetric origin and those not involving the sphincter. They evaluated the clinical history, causes and types of lesions, as well as treatment, complications and outcomes. Five of the lesions were caused by impalement, one by an explosion and one by a motorboat propeller blade. Six of the patients (85.7%) were treated by direct primary repair and one (14.3%) by secondary repair after a previous colostomy. All 7 patients achieved complete recovery of the lesions. Only two cases (28.6%) of early complications and one case (14.3%) of persistent minimal sphincter dysfunction occurred. On the basis of these good results, the clinical experience and the literature, the Authors suggest that these perineo-ano-rectal lesions, though often complex, may often be cured by early surgery, confining colostomy only to particular cases. In addition to experience with trauma and the timing of colo-proctological surgery, a knowledge of all the available surgical options is mandatory to achieve the best results.

Traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus are infrequent but difficult to treat, requiring experience with trauma and colo-proctological surgery. The aim of the treatment is to repair the lesions and to minimise the early complications which are the main cause of failure and of late complications and disability. The most complicated lesions present problems concerning either the surgical strategy or the surgical timing, both of which are essential for a successful outcome. The Authors analyse their recent clinical experience with 7 patients with complex traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus, excluding those of gynaecological/obstetric origin and those not involving the sphincter. They evaluated the clinical history, causes and types of lesions, as well as treatment, complications and outcomes. Five of the lesions were caused by impalement, one by an explosion and one by a motorboat propeller blade. Six of the patients (85.7%) were treated by direct primary repair and one (14.3%) by secondary repair after a previous colostomy. All 7 patients achieved complete recovery of the lesions. Only two cases (28.6%) of early complications and one case (14.3%) of persistent minimal sphincter dysfunction occurred. On the basis of these good results, the clinical experience and the literature, the Authors suggest that these perineo-ano-rectal lesions, though often complex, may often be cured by early surgery, confining colostomy only to particular cases. In addition to experience with trauma and the timing of colo-proctological surgery, a knowledge of all the available surgical options is mandatory to achieve the best results

Perineo-ano-rectal injuries: clinical experience

LA GRECA, Gaetano;LATTERI S;RUSSELLO, Domenico
2008

Abstract

Traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus are infrequent but difficult to treat, requiring experience with trauma and colo-proctological surgery. The aim of the treatment is to repair the lesions and to minimise the early complications which are the main cause of failure and of late complications and disability. The most complicated lesions present problems concerning either the surgical strategy or the surgical timing, both of which are essential for a successful outcome. The Authors analyse their recent clinical experience with 7 patients with complex traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus, excluding those of gynaecological/obstetric origin and those not involving the sphincter. They evaluated the clinical history, causes and types of lesions, as well as treatment, complications and outcomes. Five of the lesions were caused by impalement, one by an explosion and one by a motorboat propeller blade. Six of the patients (85.7%) were treated by direct primary repair and one (14.3%) by secondary repair after a previous colostomy. All 7 patients achieved complete recovery of the lesions. Only two cases (28.6%) of early complications and one case (14.3%) of persistent minimal sphincter dysfunction occurred. On the basis of these good results, the clinical experience and the literature, the Authors suggest that these perineo-ano-rectal lesions, though often complex, may often be cured by early surgery, confining colostomy only to particular cases. In addition to experience with trauma and the timing of colo-proctological surgery, a knowledge of all the available surgical options is mandatory to achieve the best results
Traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus are infrequent but difficult to treat, requiring experience with trauma and colo-proctological surgery. The aim of the treatment is to repair the lesions and to minimise the early complications which are the main cause of failure and of late complications and disability. The most complicated lesions present problems concerning either the surgical strategy or the surgical timing, both of which are essential for a successful outcome. The Authors analyse their recent clinical experience with 7 patients with complex traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus, excluding those of gynaecological/obstetric origin and those not involving the sphincter. They evaluated the clinical history, causes and types of lesions, as well as treatment, complications and outcomes. Five of the lesions were caused by impalement, one by an explosion and one by a motorboat propeller blade. Six of the patients (85.7%) were treated by direct primary repair and one (14.3%) by secondary repair after a previous colostomy. All 7 patients achieved complete recovery of the lesions. Only two cases (28.6%) of early complications and one case (14.3%) of persistent minimal sphincter dysfunction occurred. On the basis of these good results, the clinical experience and the literature, the Authors suggest that these perineo-ano-rectal lesions, though often complex, may often be cured by early surgery, confining colostomy only to particular cases. In addition to experience with trauma and the timing of colo-proctological surgery, a knowledge of all the available surgical options is mandatory to achieve the best results.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/8240
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact