The use of bacteria as probiotics is in continuous development, thanks to their capacity to maintain or restore a host's natural microbiome by interference with and/or inhibition of other microorganisms mediated by antimicrobial peptide production such as bacteriocins. In the oral cavity, Streptococcus salivarius, a non-pathogenic and predominant oral species, is one of the major bacteriocin producers that is able to coexist in this environment and reduce the frequency of colonization of the main pathogens involved in upper respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to screen oral bacteria colonizing healthy children for their use as potential oral probiotics. Eighty-one α-hemolytic streptococci isolated from nasal and/or pharyngeal swabs of 31 healthy children aged between two and twelve years were isolated. Among them, 13 α-hemolytic streptococci were selected for their bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity against potential pathogens. These strains were tested for bacteriocin production and assayed for their capacity to adhere to HEp-2 cell lines. Our data showed that 13 bacteriocin producer strains were able to inhibit different gram-positive pathogens. Among them one strain, S. salivarius 24SMB, deposited as DSM 23307, was selected as a potential oral probiotic, thanks to its safety assessment, ability to inhibit Streptococcus pneumoniae and the absence of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes.

The use of bacteria as probiotics is in continuous development, thanks to their capacity to maintain or restore a host's natural microbiome by interference with and/or inhibition of other microorganisms mediated by antimicrobial peptide production such as bacteriocins. In the oral cavity, Streptococcus salivarius, a non-pathogenic and predominant oral species, is one of the major bacteriocin producers that is able to coexist in this environment and reduce the frequency of colonization of the main pathogens involved in upper respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to screen oral bacteria colonizing healthy children for their use as potential oral probiotics. Eighty-one α-hemolytic streptococci isolated from nasal and/or pharyngeal swabs of 31 healthy children aged between two and twelve years were isolated. Among them, 13 α-hemolytic streptococci were selected for their bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity against potential pathogens. These strains were tested for bacteriocin production and assayed for their capacity to adhere to HEp-2 cell lines. Our data showed that 13 bacteriocin producer strains were able to inhibit different gram-positive pathogens. Among them one strain, S. salivarius 24SMB, deposited as DSM 23307, was selected as a potential oral probiotic, thanks to its safety assessment, ability to inhibit Streptococcus pneumoniae and the absence of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes.

Bacteriocin-producing oral streptococci and inhibition of respiratory pathogens

SANTAGATI, Maria Carmela;STEFANI, Stefania
2012

Abstract

The use of bacteria as probiotics is in continuous development, thanks to their capacity to maintain or restore a host's natural microbiome by interference with and/or inhibition of other microorganisms mediated by antimicrobial peptide production such as bacteriocins. In the oral cavity, Streptococcus salivarius, a non-pathogenic and predominant oral species, is one of the major bacteriocin producers that is able to coexist in this environment and reduce the frequency of colonization of the main pathogens involved in upper respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to screen oral bacteria colonizing healthy children for their use as potential oral probiotics. Eighty-one α-hemolytic streptococci isolated from nasal and/or pharyngeal swabs of 31 healthy children aged between two and twelve years were isolated. Among them, 13 α-hemolytic streptococci were selected for their bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity against potential pathogens. These strains were tested for bacteriocin production and assayed for their capacity to adhere to HEp-2 cell lines. Our data showed that 13 bacteriocin producer strains were able to inhibit different gram-positive pathogens. Among them one strain, S. salivarius 24SMB, deposited as DSM 23307, was selected as a potential oral probiotic, thanks to its safety assessment, ability to inhibit Streptococcus pneumoniae and the absence of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes.
The use of bacteria as probiotics is in continuous development, thanks to their capacity to maintain or restore a host's natural microbiome by interference with and/or inhibition of other microorganisms mediated by antimicrobial peptide production such as bacteriocins. In the oral cavity, Streptococcus salivarius, a non-pathogenic and predominant oral species, is one of the major bacteriocin producers that is able to coexist in this environment and reduce the frequency of colonization of the main pathogens involved in upper respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to screen oral bacteria colonizing healthy children for their use as potential oral probiotics. Eighty-one α-hemolytic streptococci isolated from nasal and/or pharyngeal swabs of 31 healthy children aged between two and twelve years were isolated. Among them, 13 α-hemolytic streptococci were selected for their bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity against potential pathogens. These strains were tested for bacteriocin production and assayed for their capacity to adhere to HEp-2 cell lines. Our data showed that 13 bacteriocin producer strains were able to inhibit different gram-positive pathogens. Among them one strain, S. salivarius 24SMB, deposited as DSM 23307, was selected as a potential oral probiotic, thanks to its safety assessment, ability to inhibit Streptococcus pneumoniae and the absence of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes.
oral probiotics; Streptococcus salivarius ; bacteriocins
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/8679
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 35
  • Scopus 88
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 86
social impact