INTRODUCTION: The rate of hepatitis B virus transmission via organs from with isolated hepatitis B virus core antibody-positive (HBcAb+) donors in kidney transplant recipients seems very low. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Over 4 years, we performed 36 transplants from Ig HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative donors into recipients with a history of prior hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or reported vaccination (28 patients) and in recipients who were not immunized and received a pretransplant prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins. We examined the HBV-related outcomes in these 36 patients in comparison with 40 recipients of allografts from HBcAb- donors. RESULTS: No patient receiving an allograft from an HBcAb+ donor developed clinical HBV infection or HBSAg positivity. The rate of seroconversion was 14.2% in immunized patients, 12.5% in nonimmunized patients, and 0% in the control group. The 17.8% of immunized patients developed elevated transaminases after transplant, in comparison with 25% and 10% in the nonimmunized patients and the control group, respectively. Graft and patient survival was 93% and 93% for immunized patients, 100% and 100% for nonimmunized patients, and 98% and 95% for the control group, respectively. CONCLUSION: The use of anti-HBc antibody-positive kidneys was associated with no risk of transmission of HBV infection, without affecting graft and patient survival, and could be considered a safe way to expand the donor pool. Our preliminary results suggest that such kidneys could be safely transplanted even in not immunized patients who underwent a prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins.

Introduction. The rate of hepatitis B virus transmission via organs from with isolated hepatitis B virus core antibody-positive (HBcAb+) donors in kidney transplant recipients seems very low. Patients and Methods. Over 4 years, we performed 36 transplants from Ig HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative donors into recipients with a history of prior hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or reported vaccination (28 patients) and in recipients who were not immunized and received a pretransplant prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins. We examined the HBV-related outcomes in these 36 patients in comparison with 40 recipients of allografts from HBcAb- donors. Results. No patient receiving an allograft from an HBcAb+ donor developed clinical HBV infection or HBSAg positivity. The rate of seroconversion was 14.2% in immunized patients, 12.5% in nonimmunized patients, and 0% in the control group. The 17.8% of immunized patients developed elevated transaminases after transplant, in comparison with 25% and 10% in the nonimmunized patients and the control group, respectively. Graft and patient survival was 93% and 93% for immunized patients, 100% and 100% for nonimmunized patients, and 98% and 95% for the control group, respectively. Conclusion. The use of anti-HBc antibody-positive kidneys was associated with no risk of transmission of HBV infection, without affecting graft and patient survival, and could be considered a safe way to expand the donor pool. Our preliminary results suggest that such kidneys could be safely transplanted even in not immunized patients who underwent a prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins.

Use of hepatitis B core anti body-positive donor kidneys in hepatitis B surface antibody-positive and -negative recipients

VEROUX, Massimiliano;VEROUX, Pierfrancesco
2005

Abstract

Introduction. The rate of hepatitis B virus transmission via organs from with isolated hepatitis B virus core antibody-positive (HBcAb+) donors in kidney transplant recipients seems very low. Patients and Methods. Over 4 years, we performed 36 transplants from Ig HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative donors into recipients with a history of prior hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or reported vaccination (28 patients) and in recipients who were not immunized and received a pretransplant prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins. We examined the HBV-related outcomes in these 36 patients in comparison with 40 recipients of allografts from HBcAb- donors. Results. No patient receiving an allograft from an HBcAb+ donor developed clinical HBV infection or HBSAg positivity. The rate of seroconversion was 14.2% in immunized patients, 12.5% in nonimmunized patients, and 0% in the control group. The 17.8% of immunized patients developed elevated transaminases after transplant, in comparison with 25% and 10% in the nonimmunized patients and the control group, respectively. Graft and patient survival was 93% and 93% for immunized patients, 100% and 100% for nonimmunized patients, and 98% and 95% for the control group, respectively. Conclusion. The use of anti-HBc antibody-positive kidneys was associated with no risk of transmission of HBV infection, without affecting graft and patient survival, and could be considered a safe way to expand the donor pool. Our preliminary results suggest that such kidneys could be safely transplanted even in not immunized patients who underwent a prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins.
INTRODUCTION: The rate of hepatitis B virus transmission via organs from with isolated hepatitis B virus core antibody-positive (HBcAb+) donors in kidney transplant recipients seems very low. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Over 4 years, we performed 36 transplants from Ig HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative donors into recipients with a history of prior hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or reported vaccination (28 patients) and in recipients who were not immunized and received a pretransplant prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins. We examined the HBV-related outcomes in these 36 patients in comparison with 40 recipients of allografts from HBcAb- donors. RESULTS: No patient receiving an allograft from an HBcAb+ donor developed clinical HBV infection or HBSAg positivity. The rate of seroconversion was 14.2% in immunized patients, 12.5% in nonimmunized patients, and 0% in the control group. The 17.8% of immunized patients developed elevated transaminases after transplant, in comparison with 25% and 10% in the nonimmunized patients and the control group, respectively. Graft and patient survival was 93% and 93% for immunized patients, 100% and 100% for nonimmunized patients, and 98% and 95% for the control group, respectively. CONCLUSION: The use of anti-HBc antibody-positive kidneys was associated with no risk of transmission of HBV infection, without affecting graft and patient survival, and could be considered a safe way to expand the donor pool. Our preliminary results suggest that such kidneys could be safely transplanted even in not immunized patients who underwent a prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulins.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/9791
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