Summary Objective It is well known that sleep‐related motor seizures can originate from the temporal lobe. However, little is known about the clinical features of minor motor manifestations during sleep in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The main objective of our study was to verify the existence of minor motor events during sleep in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and to define their clinical features and electroencephalography (EEG) correlations. Methods We enrolled in the study patients with diagnosis of symptomatic MTLE and a group of healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent long‐term video ‐EEG monitoring, including at least one night of nocturnal sleep. We analyzed all the movements recorded during nocturnal sleep of patients and controls and their electroencephalographic correlations. Results We analyzed the nocturnal sleep of 15 patients with symptomatic MTLE (8 males and 7 females; mean age ± standard deviation [SD]31.8 ± 14.9 years) and of 15 healthy controls (6 males and 9 females; mean age ± SD 32.8 ± 11.2 years). The analysis of movements during sleep revealed significant differences between groups, with the patients presenting significantly more movements in sleep than healthy controls (56.7 ± 39.2 vs. 15 ± 6.1; p < 0.001) with significant differences regarding oroalimentary automatisms, limb dystonia, straightening movements and gestural automatisms. EEG analysis showed that the proportion of movements preceded by EEG abnormalities was significantly higher in patients than in controls (57.8 ± 35.9 movements vs. 16.6 ± 13.4 movements; p < 0.001). Significance The results of our study demonstrated the presence of minor motor events during sleep in patients with MTLE, suggesting an epileptic origin of these episodes. The study of nocturnal sleep in MTLE patients is useful in helping the clinicians in the diagnostic and therapeutic workup of these patients.

Electroclinical findings of minor motor events during sleep in temporal lobe epilepsy.

ZAPPIA, MARIO;SOFIA, Vito
2017

Abstract

Summary Objective It is well known that sleep‐related motor seizures can originate from the temporal lobe. However, little is known about the clinical features of minor motor manifestations during sleep in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The main objective of our study was to verify the existence of minor motor events during sleep in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and to define their clinical features and electroencephalography (EEG) correlations. Methods We enrolled in the study patients with diagnosis of symptomatic MTLE and a group of healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent long‐term video ‐EEG monitoring, including at least one night of nocturnal sleep. We analyzed all the movements recorded during nocturnal sleep of patients and controls and their electroencephalographic correlations. Results We analyzed the nocturnal sleep of 15 patients with symptomatic MTLE (8 males and 7 females; mean age ± standard deviation [SD]31.8 ± 14.9 years) and of 15 healthy controls (6 males and 9 females; mean age ± SD 32.8 ± 11.2 years). The analysis of movements during sleep revealed significant differences between groups, with the patients presenting significantly more movements in sleep than healthy controls (56.7 ± 39.2 vs. 15 ± 6.1; p < 0.001) with significant differences regarding oroalimentary automatisms, limb dystonia, straightening movements and gestural automatisms. EEG analysis showed that the proportion of movements preceded by EEG abnormalities was significantly higher in patients than in controls (57.8 ± 35.9 movements vs. 16.6 ± 13.4 movements; p < 0.001). Significance The results of our study demonstrated the presence of minor motor events during sleep in patients with MTLE, suggesting an epileptic origin of these episodes. The study of nocturnal sleep in MTLE patients is useful in helping the clinicians in the diagnostic and therapeutic workup of these patients.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/303699
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